Fighting biofilms with lantibiotics and other groups of bacteriocins

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dc.contributor.author Mathur, Harsh
dc.contributor.author Field, Des
dc.contributor.author Rea, Mary C.
dc.contributor.author Cotter, Paul D.
dc.contributor.author Hill, Colin
dc.contributor.author Ross, R. Paul
dc.date.accessioned 2018-09-06T10:39:34Z
dc.date.available 2018-09-06T10:39:34Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.citation Mathur, H., Field, D., Rea, M. C., Cotter, P. D., Hill, C. and Ross, R. P. (2018) 'Fighting biofilms with lantibiotics and other groups of bacteriocins', npj Biofilms and Microbiomes, 4, 9 (13pp). doi: 10.1038/s41522-018-0053-6 en
dc.identifier.volume 4
dc.identifier.startpage 1
dc.identifier.endpage 13
dc.identifier.issn 2055-5008
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/6723
dc.identifier.doi 10.1038/s41522-018-0053-6
dc.description.abstract Biofilms are sessile communities of bacteria typically embedded in an extracellular polymeric matrix. Bacterial cells embedded in biofilms are inherently recalcitrant to antimicrobials, compared to cells existing in a planktonic state, and are notoriously difficult to eradicate once formed. Avenues to tackle biofilms thus far have largely focussed on attempting to disrupt the initial stages of biofilm formation, including adhesion and maturation of the biofilm. Such an approach is advantageous as the concentrations required to inhibit formation of biofilms are generally much lower than removing a fully established biofilm. The crisis of antibiotic resistance in clinical settings worldwide has been further exacerbated by the ability of certain pathogenic bacteria to form biofilms. Perhaps the most notorious biofilm formers described from a clinical viewpoint have been methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Gardnerella vaginalis and Streptococcus mutans, the latter of which is found in oral biofilms. Due to the dearth of novel antibiotics in recent decades, compounded by the increasing rate of emergence of resistance amongst pathogens with a propensity for biofilm formation, solutions are urgently required to mitigate these crises. Bacteriocins are a class of antimicrobial peptides, which are ribosomally synthesised and often are more potent than their antibiotic counterparts. Here, we review a selection of studies conducted with bacteriocins with the ultimate objective of inhibiting biofilms. Overall, a deeper understanding of the precise means by which a biofilm forms on a substrate as well as insights into the mechanisms by which bacteriocins inhibit biofilms is warranted. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Nature Publishing Group en
dc.relation.uri https://www.nature.com/articles/s41522-018-0053-6
dc.rights © 2018, the Authors. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subject Pathogens en
dc.subject Biofilms en
dc.subject Antimicrobials en
dc.subject Bacteriocins en
dc.subject Antibiotic en
dc.title Fighting biofilms with lantibiotics and other groups of bacteriocins en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Colin Hill, Microbiology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: c.hill@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.contributor.funder Science Foundation Ireland
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Npj Biofilms And Microbiomes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress c.hill@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid 9
dc.relation.project info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/SFI/SFI Research Centres/12/RC/2273/IE/Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre (APC) - Interfacing Food & Medicine/


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© 2018, the Authors. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2018, the Authors. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
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