Health service utilization and related costs attributable to diabetes

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dc.contributor.author O'Neill, Kate N.
dc.contributor.author McHugh, Sheena M.
dc.contributor.author Tracey, Marsha L.
dc.contributor.author Fitzgerald, Anthony P.
dc.contributor.author Kearney, Patricia M.
dc.date.accessioned 2018-09-11T11:38:39Z
dc.date.available 2018-09-11T11:38:39Z
dc.date.issued 2018-08-28
dc.identifier.citation O'Neill, K. N., McHugh, S. M., Tracey, M. L., Fitzgerald, A. P. and Kearney, P. M. (2018) 'Health service utilization and related costs attributable to diabetes', Diabetic Medicine. doi:doi:10.1111/dme.13806 en
dc.identifier.issn 0742-3071
dc.identifier.issn 1464-5491
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/6748
dc.identifier.doi doi:10.1111/dme.13806
dc.description.abstract Aims: To estimate the health service use and direct healthcare costs attributable to diabetes using best available data and methods. Methods: A nationally representative sample of adults aged ≥50 years was analysed (n=8107). Health service use in the previous 12 months included the number of general practitioner visits, outpatient department visits, hospital admissions, and accident and emergency department attendances. Multivariable negative binomial regression was used to estimate the associations between diabetes and frequency of visits. Average marginal effects were applied to unit costs for each health service and extrapolated to the total population, calculating the incremental costs associated with diabetes. Results: The prevalence of diabetes was 8.0% (95% CI 7.4, 8.6). In fully adjusted models, diabetes was associated with additional health service use. Compared to those without diabetes, people with diabetes have, on average, 1.49 (95% CI 1.10, 1.88) additional general practitioner visits annually. Diabetes was associated with an 87% increase in outpatient visits, a 52% increase in hospital admissions and a 33% increase in accident and emergency department attendances (P<0.001). The incremental cost of this additional service use, nationally, is an estimated €88,894,421 annually, with hospital admissions accounting for 67% of these costs. Conclusion: Using robust methods, we identified substantially increased service use attributable to diabetes across the health system. Our findings highlight the urgent need to invest in the prevention and management of diabetes. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher John Wiley & Sons, Inc. en
dc.rights © 2018, John Wiley & Sons Inc. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: O'Neill, K. N., McHugh, S. M., Tracey, M. L., Fitzgerald, A. P. and Kearney, P. M. (2018) 'Health service utilization and related costs attributable to diabetes', Diabetic Medicine. doi:10.1111/dme.13806, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/dme.13806. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving. en
dc.subject Diabetes en
dc.subject Prevention and management of diabetes en
dc.subject Increased service use en
dc.subject Health service en
dc.title Health service utilization and related costs attributable to diabetes en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Patricia Kearney, Public Health, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: patricia.kearney@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.check.info Access to this article is restricted until 12 months after publication by request of the publisher. en
dc.check.date 2019-08-28
dc.date.updated 2018-09-06T08:39:47Z
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.internal.rssid 452428478
dc.contributor.funder Atlantic Philanthropies en
dc.contributor.funder Department of Health and Children, Ireland
dc.contributor.funder Irish Life plc
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Diabetic Medicine en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress patricia.kearney@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.bibliocheck In press. Check for vol. / issue / page numbers. Amend citation as necessary.


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