Phages & antibiotic resistance: are the most abundant entities on earth ready for a comeback?

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Hill, Colin
dc.contributor.author Mills, Susan
dc.contributor.author Ross, R. Paul
dc.date.accessioned 2018-09-20T15:53:46Z
dc.date.available 2018-09-20T15:53:46Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.citation Hill, C., Mills, S. and Ross, R. P. (2018) 'Phages & antibiotic resistance: are the most abundant entities on earth ready for a comeback?', Future Microbiology, 13(6), pp. 711-726. doi: 10.2217/fmb-2017-0261 en
dc.identifier.volume 13
dc.identifier.issued 6
dc.identifier.startpage 711
dc.identifier.endpage 726
dc.identifier.issn 1746-0913
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/6845
dc.identifier.doi 10.2217/fmb-2017-0261
dc.description.abstract Bacteriophages, which lost out to antibiotic therapy in the past, may be poised to make a comeback. Once discarded because of their narrow activity spectrum, it can now be viewed as a major advantage that these intracellular, self-replicating entities can exert their killing effect with minimal damage to the commensal microbiome. In eastern Europe, phages continue to be used both prophylactically and therapeutically to treat infections. More recently, much needed regulated clinical trials are underway with a view to restoring phage therapy as a tool for mainstream medicine, although current regulations may impede their full potential. One hundred years after their discovery, and amid an antibiotic resistance crisis, we must ask, what can be done to harness their full antibacterial potential? en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Future Medicine Ltd en
dc.relation.uri https://www.futuremedicine.com/doi/10.2217/fmb-2017-0261
dc.rights © 2018, Future Medicine Ltd. This work is licensed under the Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subject Antibiotic resistance en
dc.subject Bacteriophage en
dc.subject Clinical trials en
dc.subject Escherichia coli en
dc.subject Phage resistance en
dc.subject Pseudomonas aeruginosa en
dc.subject Staphylococcus aureus en
dc.title Phages & antibiotic resistance: are the most abundant entities on earth ready for a comeback? en
dc.type Review en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Colin Hill, Microbiology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: c.hill@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Future Microbiology en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress c.hill@ucc.ie en


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

© 2018, Future Medicine Ltd. This work is licensed under the Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2018, Future Medicine Ltd. This work is licensed under the Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
This website uses cookies. By using this website, you consent to the use of cookies in accordance with the UCC Privacy and Cookies Statement. For more information about cookies and how you can disable them, visit our Privacy and Cookies statement