BC200 (BCYRN1) – The shortest, long, non-coding RNA associated with cancer

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dc.contributor.author Samson, Julia
dc.contributor.author Cronin, S.
dc.contributor.author Dean, Kellie
dc.date.accessioned 2018-09-27T12:08:08Z
dc.date.available 2018-09-27T12:08:08Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.citation Samson, J., Cronin, S. and Dean, K. (2018) 'BC200 (BCYRN1) – The shortest, long, non-coding RNA associated with cancer', Non-coding RNA Research, 3(3), pp. 131-143. doi:10.1016/j.ncrna.2018.05.003 en
dc.identifier.volume 3
dc.identifier.startpage 131
dc.identifier.endpage 143
dc.identifier.issn 2468-0540
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/6915
dc.identifier.doi 10.1016/j.ncrna.2018.05.003
dc.description.abstract With the discovery that the level of RNA synthesis in human cells far exceeds what is required to express protein-coding genes, there has been a concerted scientific effort to identify, catalogue and uncover the biological functions of the non-coding transcriptome. Long, non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a diverse group of RNAs with equally wide-ranging biological roles in the cell. An increasing number of studies have reported alterations in the expression of lncRNAs in various cancers, although unravelling how they contribute specifically to the disease is a bigger challenge. Originally described as a brain-specific, non-coding RNA, BC200 (BCYRN1) is a 200-nucleotide, predominantly cytoplasmic lncRNA that has been linked to neurodegenerative disease and several types of cancer. Here we summarise what is known about BC200, primarily from studies in neuronal systems, before turning to a review of recent work that aims to understand how this lncRNA contributes to cancer initiation, progression and metastasis, along with its possible clinical utility as a biomarker or therapeutic target. en
dc.description.sponsorship Irish Research Council (Government of Ireland Postgraduate Scholarship (GOIPG/2017/579); University College Cork (Translational Research Access Programme) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Elsevier en
dc.relation.uri https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2468054017300537?via%3Dihub
dc.rights © 2018, Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of KeAi Communications Co., Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/) en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subject Long non-coding RNA en
dc.subject lncRNA en
dc.subject Cancer en
dc.subject BC200 en
dc.subject BCYRN1 en
dc.subject Translational regulation en
dc.subject RNA-protein interactions en
dc.title BC200 (BCYRN1) – The shortest, long, non-coding RNA associated with cancer en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Kellie Dean, Biochemistry & Cell Biology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: k.dean@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.contributor.funder Irish Research Council
dc.contributor.funder University College Cork
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Non-coding RNA Research en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress k.dean@ucc.ie en


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© 2018, Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of KeAi Communications Co., Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/) Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2018, Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of KeAi Communications Co., Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/)
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