Not so shore anymore: the new imperatives when sourcing in the age of open

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dc.contributor.author Agerfalk, Par J.
dc.contributor.author Fitzgerald, Brian
dc.contributor.author Stol, Klaas-Jan
dc.date.accessioned 2018-10-04T15:07:55Z
dc.date.available 2018-10-04T15:07:55Z
dc.date.issued 2015-01
dc.identifier.citation Ågerfalk, P. J., Fitzgerald, B. and Stol, K. J, (2018) 'Not so Shore Anymore: The New Imperatives When Sourcing in the Age of Open', Twenty-Third European Conference on Information Systems (ECIS), Münster, Germany, 26-29 May, ECIS Proceedings 2015 Completed Research Papers. Paper 2. doi:10.18151/7217258 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 17 en
dc.identifier.isbn 978-3-00-050284-2
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/6978
dc.identifier.doi 10.18151/7217258
dc.description.abstract Software outsourcing has been the subject of much research in the past 25 years, largely because of potential cost savings envisaged through lower labour costs, ‘follow-the-sun’ development, access to skilled developers, and proximity to new markets. In recent years, the success of the open source phe-nomenon has inspired a number of new forms of sourcing that combine the potential of global sourcing with the elusive and much sought-after possibility of increased innovation. Three of these new forms of sourcing are opensourcing, innersourcing and crowdsourcing. Based on a comparative analysis of a number of case studies of these forms of sourcing, we illustrate how they differ in both significant and subtle ways from outsourcing. We conclude that these emerging sourcing approaches call for conceptual development and refocusing. Specifically, to understand software sourcing in the age of open, the important concept is no longer ‘shoring,’ but rather five identified imperatives (governance sharedness, unknownness, intrinsicness, innovativeness and co-opetitiveness) and their implications for the development situation at hand. en
dc.description.sponsorship Enterprise Ireland (grant IR/2013/0021 to ITEA2-SCALARE (scalare.org)); Irish Research Council (New Foundations programme) en
dc.description.uri http://www.ecis2015.eu/ en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Association for Information Systems (AIS) en
dc.relation.uri https://aisel.aisnet.org/ecis2015_cr/2
dc.relation.uri http://www.ecis2015.eu/
dc.rights © 2015, the authors. This material is brought to you by the European Conference on Information Systems (ECIS) at AIS Electronic Library (AISeL). It has been accepted for inclusion in ECIS 2011 Proceedings by an authorized administrator of AIS Electronic Library (AISeL). en
dc.subject Outsourcing en
dc.subject Open innovation en
dc.subject Open source en
dc.subject Opensourcing en
dc.subject Inner source en
dc.subject Innersourcing en
dc.subject Crowdsourcing en
dc.title Not so shore anymore: the new imperatives when sourcing in the age of open en
dc.type Conference item en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Klaas-Jan Stol, Computer Science, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: k.stol@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2018-10-03T20:50:14Z
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.internal.rssid 419971455
dc.contributor.funder Science Foundation Ireland en
dc.contributor.funder Enterprise Ireland en
dc.contributor.funder Irish Research Council en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle ECIS Proceedings en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress k.stol@ucc.ie en
dc.relation.project info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/SFI/SFI Research Centres/13/RC/2094/IE/Lero - the Irish Software Research Centre/ en


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