Patients' perspectives on anti-epileptic medication: relationships between beliefs about medicines and adherence among patients with epilepsy in UK primary care

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dc.contributor.author Chapman, Sarah C. E.
dc.contributor.author Horne, R.
dc.contributor.author Chater, A.
dc.contributor.author Hukins, D.
dc.contributor.author Smithson, W. Henry
dc.date.accessioned 2018-10-05T11:39:25Z
dc.date.available 2018-10-05T11:39:25Z
dc.date.issued 2014-02
dc.identifier.citation Chapman, S. C. E., Horne, R., Chater, A., Hukins, D. and Smithson, W. H. (2014) 'Patients' perspectives on anti-epileptic medication: relationships between beliefs about medicines and adherence among patients with epilepsy in UK primary care', Epilepsy and Behavior, 31, pp. 312-320. doi:10.1016/j.yebeh.2013.10.016 en
dc.identifier.volume 31 en
dc.identifier.startpage 312 en
dc.identifier.endpage 320 en
dc.identifier.issn 1525-5050
dc.identifier.issn 1525-5069
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/6984
dc.identifier.doi 10.1016/j.yebeh.2013.10.016
dc.description.abstract Background: Nonadherence to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) can result in suboptimal outcomes for patients. Aim: This study aimed to assess the utility of a theory-based approach to understanding patient perspectives on AEDs and adherence. Method: Patients with epilepsy, identified by a GP case note review, were mailed validated questionnaires assessing their perceptions of AEDs and their adherence to them. Results: Most (84.9%) of the 398 AED-treated respondents accepted the necessity of AEDs, but over half expressed doubts, with 55% disagreeing or uncertain about the statement ‘I would prefer to take epilepsy medication than risk a seizure’. Over a third (36.4%) expressed strong concerns about the potential negative effects of AEDs. We used self-report and medication possession ratio to classify 36.4% of patients as nonadherent. Nonadherence was related to beliefs about medicines and implicit attitudes toward AEDs (p < 0.05). Adherence-related attitudes toward AEDs were correlated with general beliefs about pharmaceuticals (BMQ General: General Harm, General Overuse, and General Benefit scales) and perceptions of personal sensitivity to medicines (PSM scale). Conclusion: We identified salient, adherence-related beliefs about AEDs. Patient-centered interventions to support medicine optimization for people with epilepsy should take account of these beliefs. en
dc.description.sponsorship Health Foundation, United Kingdom (‘Leading Practice Through Research’ grant) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Elsevier Inc. en
dc.rights © 2013, the Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. This article is available under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). You may distribute and copy the article, create extracts, abstracts, and other revised versions, adaptations or derivative works of or from an article (such as a translation), to include in a collective work (such as an anthology), to text or data mine the article, including for commercial purposes without permission from Elsevier. The original work must always be appropriately credited. en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Medicine adherence en
dc.subject Epilepsy en
dc.subject Antiepileptic drugs en
dc.subject Primary care en
dc.subject Perceived Sensitivity to Medicines scale en
dc.subject PSM en
dc.subject Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire en
dc.subject BMQ en
dc.title Patients' perspectives on anti-epileptic medication: relationships between beliefs about medicines and adherence among patients with epilepsy in UK primary care en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother William Henry Smithson, General Practice, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: henry.smithson@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2018-10-05T11:30:26Z
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.rssid 250594304
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Epilepsy and Behavior en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress henry.smithson@ucc.ie en


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© 2013, the Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. This article is available under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). You may distribute and copy the article, create extracts, abstracts, and other revised versions, adaptations or derivative works of or from an article (such as a translation), to include in a collective work (such as an anthology), to text or data mine the article, including for commercial purposes without permission from Elsevier. The original work must always be appropriately credited. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2013, the Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. This article is available under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). You may distribute and copy the article, create extracts, abstracts, and other revised versions, adaptations or derivative works of or from an article (such as a translation), to include in a collective work (such as an anthology), to text or data mine the article, including for commercial purposes without permission from Elsevier. The original work must always be appropriately credited.
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