Endocrine regulation of gut function - a role for glucagon-like peptide-1 in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome

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dc.contributor.author O'Malley, Dervla
dc.date.accessioned 2019-01-21T11:33:32Z
dc.date.available 2019-01-21T11:33:32Z
dc.date.issued 2018-11-16
dc.identifier.citation O'Malley, D. (2018) 'Endocrine regulation of gut function - a role for glucagon-like peptide-1 in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome', Experimental Physiology, 104(1), pp. 3-10. doi:10.1113/EP087443 en
dc.identifier.volume 104 en
dc.identifier.issued 1 en
dc.identifier.startpage 3 en
dc.identifier.endpage 10 en
dc.identifier.issn 0958-0670
dc.identifier.issn 1469-445X
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/7326
dc.identifier.doi 10.1113/EP087443
dc.description.abstract The prevalent and debilitating functional bowel disorder, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), is characterized by symptoms that include abdominal pain, bloating, diarrhoea and/or constipation. The heterogeneity of IBS underscores a complex multifactorial pathophysiology, which is not completely understood but involves dysfunction of the bi‐directional signalling axis between the brain and the gut. This axis incorporates efferent and afferent branches of the autonomic nervous system, circulating endocrine hormones and immune factors, local paracrine and neurocrine factors and microbial metabolites. L‐cells, which are electrically excitable biosensors embedded in the gastrointestinal epithelium, secrete glucagon‐like peptide‐1 (GLP‐1) in response to nutrients in the small intestine. However, they appear to function in a different manner more distally in the gastrointestinal tract, where they are activated by luminal factors including short‐chain fatty acids, bile acids and microbial metabolic products, all of which are altered in IBS patients. Glucagon‐like peptide‐1 can also interact with the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal stress axis and the immune system, both of which are activated in IBS. Given that a GLP‐1 mimetic has been found to alleviate acute pain symptoms in IBS patients, GLP‐1 might be important in the manifestation of IBS symptoms. This review assesses the current knowledge about the role of GLP‐1 in IBS pathophysiology and its potential role as a signal transducer in the microbiome–gut–brain signalling axis. en
dc.description.sponsorship Wellcome Trust‐Health Research Board‐Science Foundation Ireland (Seed Grant Number: WT108228MA); University College Cork (Translational Research Access Programme Grant Number: 2015) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher John Wiley & Sons, Inc. en
dc.rights © 2018, the Author. Experimental Physiology © 2018, The Physiological Society. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: O'Malley, D. (2018) 'Endocrine regulation of gut function - a role for glucagon-like peptide-1 in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome', Experimental Physiology, 104(1), pp. 3-10. doi:10.1113/EP087443, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1113/EP087443. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions. en
dc.subject Irritable bowel syndrome en
dc.subject Glucagon‐like peptide‐1 en
dc.subject L‐cells en
dc.title Endocrine regulation of gut function - a role for glucagon-like peptide-1 in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Dervla O'Malley, Physiology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: d.omalley@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.check.info Access to this article is restricted until 12 months after publication by request of the publisher. en
dc.check.date 2019-11-16
dc.date.updated 2019-01-21T11:18:34Z
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.internal.rssid 470360174
dc.contributor.funder Wellcome Trust en
dc.contributor.funder Health Research Board en
dc.contributor.funder Science Foundation Ireland en
dc.contributor.funder University College Cork en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Experimental Physiology en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress d.omalley@ucc.ie en
dc.relation.project info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/SFI/SFI Research Centres/12/RC/2273/IE/Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre (APC) - Interfacing Food & Medicine/ en


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