Gender-based insecurity and opportunities for peace: supporting the reintegration of young war-affected mothers.

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dc.contributor.author Worthen, Miranda
dc.contributor.author McKay, Susan
dc.contributor.author Veale, Angela
dc.contributor.author Wessells, Mike
dc.date.accessioned 2019-02-05T10:41:59Z
dc.date.available 2019-02-05T10:41:59Z
dc.date.issued 2011
dc.identifier.citation Worthen, M, McKay, S., Veale, A. and Wessells, M. (2011) 'Gender-based insecurity and opportunities for peace: Supporting the reintegration of young war-affected mothers', Disarmament Forum, 3, pp. 35-45. en
dc.identifier.volume 3 en
dc.identifier.startpage 36 en
dc.identifier.endpage 45 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/7434
dc.description.abstract In conflicts throughout the world, armed forces and groups recruit children to fight, maintain their camps, perform labor and be used for sexual purposes. The experiences of children associated with armed forces and groups (CAAFAG) are not uniform, nor can there be a uniform approach to helping them when the conflict is over. This article examines the gendered experiences of girls prior to recruitment, during their time with the fighting forces, through disarmament, demobilization and reintegration (DDR) processes, and in their communities after formal DDR has ended. We also present some of the experiences of the Participatory Action Research (PAR) Study with Young Mothers in Liberia, Sierra Leone and Northern Uganda—a study conducted predominantly with former CAAFAG which used a highly participatory methodology to help participants attain community-based reintegration. In the PAR study young mother participants took a central role in the design and implementation of their reintegration process. A mixture of self-help style psychosocial support and livelihood support were critical to their success. As this population had exceptionally low social status, lacked confidence and self-respect, and did not have rudimentary economic skills at the start, social support and community mobilization were critical in laying the groundwork for livelihood activities and facilitating the sustainability of these activities. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research (UNIDIR) en
dc.relation.uri http://www.unidir.org/files/publications/pdfs/children-and-conflict-en-315.pdf
dc.rights © 2011 United Nations en
dc.subject Child solider en
dc.subject Participatory research en
dc.subject Gender en
dc.subject Girls en
dc.subject Mothers en
dc.subject Liberia en
dc.subject Sierra Leone en
dc.subject Uganda en
dc.title Gender-based insecurity and opportunities for peace: supporting the reintegration of young war-affected mothers. en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Angela Veale, Applied Psychology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: a.veale@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2019-02-05T10:36:14Z
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.rssid 237297071
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Disarmament Forum en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked No !!CORA!! en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress a.veale@ucc.ie en


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