The lasting impact of early-life adversity on individuals and their descendants: potential mechanisms and hope for intervention

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dc.contributor.author Cowan, Caitlin S. M.
dc.contributor.author Callaghan, Bridget L.
dc.contributor.author Kan, Janice M.
dc.contributor.author Richardson, Rick
dc.date.accessioned 2019-02-06T14:44:02Z
dc.date.available 2019-02-06T14:44:02Z
dc.date.issued 2015-10-20
dc.identifier.citation Cowan, C. S. M., Callaghan, B. L., Kan, J. M. and Richardson, R. (2016) 'The lasting impact of early-life adversity on individuals and their descendants: potential mechanisms and hope for intervention', Genes, Brain and Behavior, 15(1), pp. 155-168. doi: 10.1111/gbb.12263 en
dc.identifier.volume 15 en
dc.identifier.issued 1 en
dc.identifier.startpage 155 en
dc.identifier.endpage 168 en
dc.identifier.issn 1601-183X
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/7455
dc.identifier.doi 10.1111/gbb.12263
dc.description.abstract The adverse effects of early-life stress are pervasive, with well-established mental and physical health consequences for exposed individuals. The impact of early adverse experiences is also highly persistent, with documented increases in risk for mental illness across the life span that are accompanied by stable alterations in neural function and hormonal responses to stress. Here, we review some of these 'stress phenotypes', with a focus on intermediary factors that may signal risk for long-term mental health outcomes, such as altered development of the fear regulation system. Intriguingly, recent research suggests that such stress phenotypes may persist even beyond the life span of the individuals, with consequences for their offspring and grand-offspring. Phenotypic characteristics may be transmitted to future generations via either the matriline or the patriline, a phenomenon that has been demonstrated in both human and animal studies. In this review, we highlight behavioral and epigenetic factors that may contribute to this multigenerational transmission and discuss the potential of various treatment approaches that may halt the cycle of stress phenotypes. en
dc.description.sponsorship Petre Foundation (Petre Foundation Scholarship); University of New South Wales (UNSW Research Excellence Award), (Australian PostgraduateAward); National Health and Medical Research Council ((APP109157), (APP1031688)); en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Wiley en
dc.relation.uri https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/gbb.12263
dc.rights © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Cowan et al. (2016), The lasting impact of early‐life adversity on individuals and their descendants: potential mechanisms and hope for intervention. Genes, Brain and Behavior, 15: 155-168, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/gbb.12263. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving. en
dc.subject Early‐life stress en
dc.subject Emotion regulation en
dc.subject Epigenetics en
dc.subject Fear learning en
dc.subject Memory en
dc.subject Treatment en
dc.title The lasting impact of early-life adversity on individuals and their descendants: potential mechanisms and hope for intervention en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Caitlin Cowan, Alimentary Pharmabotic Centre (APC), University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: caitlin.cowan@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2019-02-05T16:56:04Z
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.internal.rssid 472455954
dc.internal.pmid 26482536
dc.contributor.funder Petre Foundation en
dc.contributor.funder University of New South Wales en
dc.contributor.funder National Health and Medical Research Council en
dc.contributor.funder Australian Research Council en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Genes Brain And Behavior en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked No !!CORA!! en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress caitlin.cowan@ucc.ie en
dc.relation.project info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/ARC/Discovery Projects/DP150104835/AU/Discovery Projects - Grant ID: DP150104835/ en


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