Use of addiction treatment services by Irish youth: does place of residence matter?

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dc.contributor.author Murphy, Kevin D.
dc.contributor.author Byrne, Stephen
dc.contributor.author Sahm, Laura J.
dc.contributor.author Lambert, Sharon
dc.contributor.author McCarthy, Suzanne
dc.date.accessioned 2019-02-11T16:48:16Z
dc.date.available 2019-02-11T16:48:16Z
dc.date.issued 2014-08-06
dc.identifier.citation Murphy, K. D., Byrne, S., Sahm, L. J., Lambert, S. and McCarthy, S. (2014) 'Use of addiction treatment services by Irish youth: does place of residence matter?', Rural and remote health, 14(3), 2735 (9 pp). en
dc.identifier.volume 14 en
dc.identifier.issued 3 en
dc.identifier.startpage 2735-1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 2735-9 en
dc.identifier.issn 1445-6354
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/7478
dc.description.abstract Introduction: Substance abuse treatment centres for Irish rural youth have largely been overlooked in the scientific literature. This study examined data from a substance abuse treatment centre that treats both urban and rural attendees to investigate if there are differences in usage patterns between attendee groups. Methods: A cross-sectional study was done of 436 service-users attending a treatment centre: patient characteristics, treatment referral details and substance history of the attendees from urban and rural areas were compared. Descriptive analysis of the service user population was performed and recent substance use was investigated. Inferential tests examined for differences between urban and rural service-users. Results: The typical service-user was an Irish male aged between 16 and 17 years, who resided with his parents. A greater percentage of rural service-users were employed (33.3% vs 22.2%, p=0.015), while a significantly greater percentage of urban service-users were unemployed (10.3% vs 4.1%, p=0.015). A greater proportion of urban service-users had tried multiple substances in their lifetimes (73.7% vs 52.2%, p=0.001) and continued to use multiple substances regularly (49.3% vs 31.3%, p=0.003) compared with their rural counterparts. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher James Cook University en
dc.relation.uri https://www.rrh.org.au/journal/article/2735
dc.rights © KD Murphy, S Byrne, LJ Sahm, S Lambert, S McCarthy, 2014. A licence to publish this material has been given to James Cook University, http://www.rrh.org.au en
dc.subject Alcohol en
dc.subject Benzodiazepines en
dc.subject Inhalants en
dc.subject Ireland en
dc.subject Polysubstance use en
dc.subject Young people en
dc.title Use of addiction treatment services by Irish youth: does place of residence matter? en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Sharon Lambert, School Of Applied Psychology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: sharon.lambert@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2019-02-11T16:43:53Z
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.rssid 266260546
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Rural and remote health en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked No !!CORA!! en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress sharon.lambert@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress l.sahm@ucc.ie en


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