Submerged stories: the evolution of William Faulkner's snopes trilogy

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dc.contributor.advisor Jenkins, Lee en
dc.contributor.author O'Callaghan, Eoin Martin
dc.date.accessioned 2019-04-23T12:22:11Z
dc.date.issued 2019
dc.date.submitted 2019
dc.identifier.citation O'Callaghan, E. M. 2019. Submerged stories: the evolution of William Faulkner's snopes trilogy. PhD Thesis, University College Cork. en
dc.identifier.endpage 240 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/7789
dc.description.abstract While few twentieth-century writers have attracted as much critical attention as William Faulkner, there remain aspects of his work that have been neglected: his ‘Snopes’ stories of the 1920s and 1930s, and his Snopes Trilogy, written in the 1940s and 1950s, have been particularly ill-served by critics. This thesis examines the evolution of The Hamlet (1940), The Town (1957), and The Mansion (1959), collectively known as the Snopes Trilogy, and into which Faulkner incorporated elements of those earliest stories, including “Spotted Horses” (1931) and “Lizards in Jamshyd’s Courtyard” (1932). The composition of these novels is, this thesis argues, shaped and defined by a triangular relationship between place, race (specifically, whiteness) and genre, and analysis of this thirty-year-long process may be used to trace Faulkner’s evolving conception of Yoknapatawpha County and the ‘poor white’ Snopes family. The methodology for this thesis utilises close textual study, archival research, and theories of place, whiteness, and genre in order to re-evaluate the Snopes fiction, arguing for the significance of the trilogy within the Faulkner canon. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher University College Cork en
dc.rights © 2019, Eoin Martin O'Callaghan. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/ en
dc.subject William Faulkner en
dc.subject The South en
dc.subject American literature en
dc.subject Short stories en
dc.subject Snopes trilogy en
dc.title Submerged stories: the evolution of William Faulkner's snopes trilogy en
dc.type Doctoral thesis en
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral en
dc.type.qualificationname PhD en
dc.internal.availability Full text not available en
dc.check.info Indefinite en
dc.check.date 10000-01-01
dc.description.version Accepted Version
dc.contributor.funder Irish Research Council en
dc.contributor.funder University College Cork en
dc.description.status Not peer reviewed en
dc.internal.school English en
dc.check.reason This thesis is due for publication or the author is actively seeking to publish this material en
dc.check.opt-out No en
dc.thesis.opt-out false
dc.check.entireThesis Entire Thesis Restricted
dc.check.embargoformat Apply the embargo to the e-thesis on CORA (If you have submitted an e-thesis and want to embargo it on CORA) en
ucc.workflow.supervisor l.jenkins@ucc.ie
dc.internal.conferring Summer 2019 en
dc.relation.project Irish Research Council (Government of Ireland Postgraduate Scholarship); University College Cork (Strategic Research Fund) en


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© 2019, Eoin Martin O'Callaghan. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2019, Eoin Martin O'Callaghan.
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