Urinary and faecal incontinence: point prevalence and predictors in a university hospital

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dc.contributor.author Condon, Marie
dc.contributor.author Mannion, Edel
dc.contributor.author Molloy, D. William
dc.contributor.author O'Caoimh, Rónán
dc.date.accessioned 2019-05-13T11:29:13Z
dc.date.available 2019-05-13T11:29:13Z
dc.date.issued 2019
dc.identifier.citation Condon, M., Mannion, E., Molloy, D.W. and O’Caoimh, R., 2019. Urinary and Faecal Incontinence: Point Prevalence and Predictors in a University Hospital. International journal of environmental research and public health, 16(2), 194 (8pp.) DOI: 10.3390/ijerph16020194 en
dc.identifier.volume 16 en
dc.identifier.issued 2 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 8 en
dc.identifier.issn 1660-4601
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/7885
dc.identifier.doi 10.3390/ijerph16020194 en
dc.description.abstract Incontinence is common and associated with adverse outcomes. There are insufficient point prevalence data for incontinence in hospitals. We evaluated the prevalence of urinary (UI) and faecal incontinence (FI) and their predictors among inpatients in an acute university hospital on a single day. Continence status was recorded using the modified Barthel Index (BI). Baseline characteristics, Clinical Frailty Scale (CFS) and ward type were recorded. In all, 435 patients were assessed, median age 72 ± 23 years and 53% were male. The median CFS score was 5 ± 3. The point prevalence of UI was 26% versus 11% for FI. While UI and FI increased with age, to 35.2% and 21.1% respectively for those ≥85, age was not an independent predictor. Incontinence also increased with frailty; CFS scores were independently associated with both UI (p = 0.006) and FI (p = 0.03), though baseline continence status was the strongest predictor. Patients on orthopaedic wards had the highest prevalence of incontinence. Continence assessments were available for only 11 (2%) patients. UI and FI are common conditions affecting inpatients; point prevalence increases with age and frailty status. Despite this, few patients receive comprehensive continence assessments. More awareness of its high prevalence is required to ensure incontinence is adequately managed in hospitals. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher MDPI en
dc.relation.uri https://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/16/2/194/htm
dc.rights © 2019 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Urinary en
dc.subject Faecal en
dc.subject Incontinence en
dc.subject Prevalence en
dc.subject Hospital en
dc.subject Inpatient en
dc.title Urinary and faecal incontinence: point prevalence and predictors in a university hospital en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Prof. David Molloy, School of Medicine, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: w.molloy@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress w.molloy@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid 194 en


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© 2019 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2019 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license
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