Bacterial microcompartment-mediated ethanolamine metabolism in E. coli urinary tract infection

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Dadswell, Katherine
dc.contributor.author Creagh, Sinead
dc.contributor.author McCullagh, Edward
dc.contributor.author Liang, Mingzhi
dc.contributor.author Brown, Ian R.
dc.contributor.author Warren, Martin J. McNally, Alan
dc.contributor.author MacSharry, John
dc.contributor.author Prentice, Michael B.
dc.date.accessioned 2019-06-05T09:14:37Z
dc.date.available 2019-06-05T09:14:37Z
dc.date.issued 2019-05-28
dc.identifier.citation Dadswell, K., Creagh, S., McCullagh, E., Liang, M., Brown, I. R., Warren, M. J., McNally, A., MacSharry, J. and Prentice, M. B. (2019) 'Bacterial microcompartment-mediated ethanolamine metabolism in E. coli urinary tract infection', Infection and Immunity, IAI.00211-19. In Press, doi: 10.1128/iai.00211-19 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 47 en
dc.identifier.issn 0019-9567
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/8014
dc.identifier.doi 10.1128/iai.00211-19 en
dc.description.abstract Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common, in general caused by intestinal Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) ascending via the urethra. Microcompartment-mediated catabolism of ethanolamine, a host cell breakdown product, fuels competitive overgrowth of intestinal E. coli, both pathogenic enterohaemorrhagic E. coli and commensal strains. During UTI urease negative E. coli thrive, despite the comparative nutrient limitation in urine. The role of ethanolamine as a potential nutrient source during UTI is understudied. We evaluated the role of metabolism of ethanolamine as a potential nitrogen and carbon source for UPEC in the urinary tract. We analysed infected urine samples by culture, HPLC, qRT-PCR and genomic sequencing. Ethanolamine concentration in urine was comparable to the most abundant reported urinary amino acid D-serine. Transcription of the eut operon was detected in the majority of urine samples screened containing E. coli. All sequenced UPECs had conserved eut operons while metabolic genotypes previously associated with UTI (dsdCXA, metE) were mainly limited to phylogroup B2. In vitro ethanolamine was found to be utilised as a sole source of nitrogen by UPECs. Metabolism of ethanolamine in artificial urine medium (AUM) induced metabolosome formation and provided a growth advantage at the physiological levels found in urine. Interestingly, eutE (acetaldehyde dehydrogenase) was required for UPECs to utilise ethanolamine to gain a growth advantage in AUM, suggesting ethanolamine is also utilised as a carbon source. This data suggests urinary ethanolamine is a significant additional carbon and nitrogen source for infecting E. coli. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher American Society for Microbiology en
dc.relation.uri https://iai.asm.org/content/iai/early/2019/05/21/IAI.00211-19.full.pdf
dc.rights © 2019 Dadswell et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Microcompartment en
dc.subject Metabolosome en
dc.subject Urinary tract infection en
dc.subject E. coli en
dc.subject Ethanolamine en
dc.title Bacterial microcompartment-mediated ethanolamine metabolism in E. coli urinary tract infection en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Michael Prentice, Pathology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: m.prentice@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2019-06-05T09:06:52Z
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.internal.rssid 487882218
dc.contributor.funder Science Foundation Ireland en
dc.contributor.funder Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Infection and Immunity en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked No
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress m.prentice@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid IAI.00211-19 en
dc.internal.bibliocheck In Press. Update citation, add vol. issue, update page nos. en
dc.relation.project info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/SFI/SFI Research Centres/12/RC/2273/IE/Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre (APC) - Interfacing Food & Medicine/ en
dc.relation.project info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/RCUK/BBSRC/BB/M002969/1/GB/Development of supramolecular assemblies for enhancing cellular productivity and the synthesis of fine chemicals and biotherapeutics./ en
dc.relation.project info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/RCUK/BBSRC/BB/H013180/1/GB/Synthetic biology approaches to compartmentalisation in bacteria and the construction of novel bioreactors/ en
dc.relation.project info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/RCUK/BBSRC/BB/L024209/1/GB/MicrobesNG: A scalable replicable biological sample repository incorporating whole-genome sequence data and analysis of thousands of microbial strains/ en
dc.identifier.eissn 1098-5522


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

© 2019 Dadswell et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2019 Dadswell et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license.
This website uses cookies. By using this website, you consent to the use of cookies in accordance with the UCC Privacy and Cookies Statement. For more information about cookies and how you can disable them, visit our Privacy and Cookies statement