The Irish credit union movement: member participation and organisational effectiveness

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dc.contributor.advisor Briscoe, Robert
dc.contributor.advisor Ward, Michael
dc.contributor.author McCarthy, Olive
dc.date.accessioned 2012-11-26T17:23:31Z
dc.date.available 2012-11-26T17:23:31Z
dc.date.issued 2005-09
dc.date.submitted 2005
dc.identifier.citation McCarthy, O. 2005. The Irish credit union movement: member participation and organisational effectiveness. PhD Thesis, University College Cork. en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/806
dc.description.abstract This thesis explores the relationship between organisational effectiveness and member participation in Irish credit unions. It is hypothesised that a positive relationship exists between both variables. Co-operative literature suggests that co-operatives require the involvement of the members in identifying and meeting their own needs in order to be effective organisations. Previous research studies into the issue across a variety of organisational types have shown mixed results. Related research into credit unions is sparse. The primary research undertaken is both quantitative and qualitative in approach. Organisational effectiveness is examined in both quantitative and qualitative terms. Member participation, being an organisational process, is examined in qualitative terms. Indicators of organisational effectiveness, specific to credit unions, are drawn up and form a framework through which effectiveness is examined. A typology and indicators of member participation are also developed and form a framework through which member participation is examined. The case study method is used primarily, to examine organisational effectiveness and member participation in Irish credit unions. A case study of a theoretical credit union, which is based on a composite of good practice in credit unions in Ireland and internationally, is also drawn up to develop the analysis further. The case studies allow an analysis of both organisational effectiveness and member participation, as well as an exploration of the relationship between the two. The findings support the hypothesis that there is a direct relationship between the two variables. In order to be effective, credit unions must involve their members in identifying their needs and in designing services to meet these needs. At present, they do not do this to any large extent. In order to continue to meet the needs of their members and to compete in the financial services sector, credit unions will need to find ways of involving members, drawing on good practice in other co-operatives. This will be critical to their continued success. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher University College Cork en
dc.relation.uri http://library.ucc.ie/record=b1551980~S0
dc.rights © 2005, Olive McCarthy en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/ en
dc.subject Irish credit unions en
dc.subject Organisational effectiveness en
dc.subject Member participation en
dc.subject.lcsh Credit unions--Ireland en
dc.title The Irish credit union movement: member participation and organisational effectiveness en
dc.type Doctoral thesis en
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral en
dc.type.qualificationname PhD (Commerce) en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.contributor.funder St. Gabriel’s Credit Union Ltd, Cork en
dc.description.status Not peer reviewed en
dc.internal.school Centre for Co-operative Studies en
dc.internal.school Food Business and Development en


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