University students’ awareness of causes and risk factors of miscarriage: a cross-sectional study

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dc.contributor.author San Lazaro Campillo, Indra
dc.contributor.author Meaney, Sarah
dc.contributor.author Sheehan, Jacqueline
dc.contributor.author Rice, Rachel
dc.contributor.author O'Donoghue, Keelin
dc.date.accessioned 2019-07-16T14:53:29Z
dc.date.available 2019-07-16T14:53:29Z
dc.date.issued 2018-11-19
dc.identifier.citation Campillo, I.S.L., Meaney, S., Sheehan, J., Rice, R. and O’Donoghue, K., 2018. University students’ awareness of causes and risk factors of miscarriage: a cross-sectional study. BMC women's health, 18, 188. (9pp). DOI: 10.1186/s12905-018-0682-1 en
dc.identifier.volume 18 en
dc.identifier.issued 1 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 9 en
dc.identifier.issn 1472-6874
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/8173
dc.identifier.doi 10.1186/s12905-018-0682-1 en
dc.description.abstract Spontaneous miscarriage is the most common complication of pregnancy, occurring in up to 20% of pregnancies. Despite the prevalence of miscarriage, little is known regarding peoples’ awareness and understanding of causes of pregnancy loss. The aim of this study was to explore university students’ understanding of rates, causes and risk factors of miscarriage. Methods: A cross-sectional study including university students. An online questionnaire was circulated to all students at the University College Cork using their university email accounts in April and May 2016. Main outcomes included identification of prevalence, weeks of gestation at which miscarriage occurs and causative risk factors for miscarriage. Results: A sample of 746 students were included in the analysis. Only 20% (n = 149) of students correctly identified the prevalence of miscarriage, and almost 30% (n = 207) incorrectly believed that miscarriage occurs in less than 10% of pregnancies. Female were more likely to correctly identify the rate of miscarriage than men (21.8% versus 14.5%). However, men tended to underestimate the rate and females overestimate it. Students who did not know someone who had a miscarriage underestimated the rate of miscarriage, and those who were aware of some celebrities who had a miscarriage overestimated the rate. Almost 43% (n = 316) of students correctly identified fetal chromosomal abnormalities as the main cause of miscarriage. Females, older students, those from Medical and Health disciplines and those who were aware of a celebrity who had a miscarriage were more likely to identify chromosomal abnormalities as a main cause. However, more than 90% of the students believed that having a fall, consuming drugs or the medical condition of the mother was a causative risk factor for miscarriage. Finally, stress was identified as a risk factor more frequently than advanced maternal age or smoking. Conclusion: Although almost half of the participants identified chromosomal abnormalities as the main cause of miscarriage, there is still a lack of understanding about the prevalence and most important risk factors among university students. University represents an ideal opportunity for health promotion strategies to increase awareness of potential adverse outcomes in pregnancy. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher BioMed Central Ltd. en
dc.relation.uri https://bmcwomenshealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12905-018-0682-1
dc.rights © 2018 The Author(s). This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated. en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Miscarraige en
dc.subject University students en
dc.subject Awareness en
dc.subject Prevalence en
dc.subject Risk factors en
dc.title University students’ awareness of causes and risk factors of miscarriage: a cross-sectional study en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Indra San Lazaro Campillo, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: indra.campillo@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.contributor.funder University College Cork en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle BMC Women's Health en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress indra.campillo@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid 188 en


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©  2018 The Author(s). This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2018 The Author(s). This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
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