High resolution in vivo bioluminescent imaging for the study of bacterial tumour targeting

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dc.contributor.author Cronin, Michelle
dc.contributor.author Akin, Ali R.
dc.contributor.author Collins, Sara A.
dc.contributor.author Meganck, Jeff
dc.contributor.author Kim, Jae-Beom
dc.contributor.author Baban, Chwanrow K.
dc.contributor.author Joyce, Susan A.
dc.contributor.author van Dam, Gooitzen M.
dc.contributor.author Zhang, Ning
dc.contributor.author van Sinderen, Douwe
dc.contributor.author O'Sullivan, Gerald C.
dc.contributor.author Kasahara, Noriyuki
dc.contributor.author Gahan, Cormac G.
dc.contributor.author Francis, Kevin P.
dc.contributor.author Tangney, Mark
dc.contributor.editor Karathanasis, Efstathios
dc.date.accessioned 2012-11-29T11:52:51Z
dc.date.available 2012-11-29T11:52:51Z
dc.date.copyright 2012
dc.date.issued 2012-01-25
dc.identifier.citation CRONIN, M., AKIN, A. R., COLLINS, S. A., MEGANCK, J., KIM, J.-B., BABAN, C. K., JOYCE, S. A., VAN DAM, G. M., ZHANG, N., VAN SINDEREN, D., O'SULLIVAN, G. C., KASAHARA, N., GAHAN, C. G., FRANCIS, K. P. & TANGNEY, M. 2012. High Resolution In Vivo Bioluminescent Imaging for the Study of Bacterial Tumour Targeting. Plos One, 7, e30940. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0030940 en
dc.identifier.volume 7 en
dc.identifier.issued 1 en
dc.identifier.startpage e30940 en
dc.identifier.issn 1932-6203
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/822
dc.identifier.doi 10.1371/journal.pone.0030940
dc.description.abstract The ability to track microbes in real time in vivo is of enormous value for preclinical investigations in infectious disease or gene therapy research. Bacteria present an attractive class of vector for cancer therapy, possessing a natural ability to grow preferentially within tumours following systemic administration. Bioluminescent Imaging (BLI) represents a powerful tool for use with bacteria engineered to express reporter genes such as lux. BLI is traditionally used as a 2D modality resulting in images that are limited in their ability to anatomically locate cell populations. Use of 3D diffuse optical tomography can localize the signals but still need to be combined with an anatomical imaging modality like micro-Computed Tomography (mCT) for interpretation. In this study, the non-pathogenic commensal bacteria E.coli K-12 MG1655 and Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003, or Salmonella Typhimurium SL7207 each expressing the luxABCDE operon were intravenously (IV) administered to mice bearing subcutaneous (s.c) FLuc-expressing xenograft tumours. Bacterial lux signal was detected specifically in tumours of mice post IV-administration and bioluminescence correlated with the numbers of bacteria recovered from tissue. Through whole body imaging for both lux and FLuc, bacteria and tumour cells were co-localised. 3D BLI and mCT image analysis revealed a pattern of multiple clusters of bacteria within tumours. Investigation of spatial resolution of 3D optical imaging was supported by ex vivo histological analyses. In vivo imaging of orally-administered commensal bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) was also achieved using 3D BLI. This study demonstrates for the first time the potential to simultaneously image multiple BLI reporter genes three dimensionally in vivo using approaches that provide unique information on spatial locations. en
dc.description.sponsorship European Commission (Seventh Framework Programme PIOF-GA-2009-255466); Health Research Board (HRA_POR/2010/138) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher PLOS en
dc.relation.uri http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0030940
dc.rights © 2012 Cronin et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/ en
dc.subject Bioluminescent imaging (BLI) en
dc.subject Tumour en
dc.subject Micro-computed tomography en
dc.subject E.coli K-12 MG1655 en
dc.subject Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003 en
dc.subject Salmonella typhimurium SL7207 en
dc.subject luxABCDE operon en
dc.subject in vivo en
dc.title High resolution in vivo bioluminescent imaging for the study of bacterial tumour targeting en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorurl http://research.ucc.ie/profiles/D010/cgahan en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Cormac Gahan, Department of Microbiology and Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. Email: c.gahan@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.rssid 121849832
dc.internal.rssid 191490338
dc.internal.rssid 191490338
dc.contributor.funder European Commission en
dc.contributor.funder Health Research Board en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle PLoS One en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Sherpa Romeo Green Journal. Policy: The Public Library of Science (PLOS) applies the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC-BY) to works we publish (read the human-readable summary or the full license legal code). Under this license, authors retain ownership of the copyright for their content, but allow anyone to download, reuse, reprint, modify, distribute, and/or copy the content as long as the original authors and source are cited. No permission is required from the authors or the publishers. Appropriate attribution can be provided by simply citing the original article (e.g., Kaltenbach LS et al. (2007) Huntingtin Interacting Proteins Are Genetic Modifiers of Neurodegeneration. PLOS Genet 3(5): e82. doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.0030082). en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress c.gahan@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress s.joyce@ucc.ie en


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© 2012 Cronin et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2012 Cronin et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
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