Precision nutrition and the microbiome part ii: Potential opportunities and pathways to commercialisation

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Mills, Susan
dc.contributor.author Lane, Jonathan A.
dc.contributor.author Smith, Graeme J.
dc.contributor.author Grimaldi, Keith A.
dc.contributor.author Ross, R. Paul
dc.contributor.author Stanton, Catherine
dc.date.accessioned 2019-09-11T09:29:04Z
dc.date.available 2019-09-11T09:29:04Z
dc.date.issued 2019-06-27
dc.identifier.citation Mills, S., Lane, J. A., Smith, G. J., Grimaldi, K. A., Ross, R. P. and Stanton, C. (2019) 'Precision Nutrition and the Microbiome Part II: Potential Opportunities and Pathways to Commercialisation', Nutrients, 11(7), 1468. (49pp.) DOI: 10.3390/nu11071468 en
dc.identifier.volume 11 en
dc.identifier.issued 7 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 49 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/8514
dc.identifier.doi 10.3390/nu11071468 en
dc.description.abstract Modulation of the human gut microbiota through probiotics, prebiotics and dietary fibre are recognised strategies to improve health and prevent disease. Yet we are only beginning to understand the impact of these interventions on the gut microbiota and the physiological consequences for the human host, thus forging the way towards evidence-based scientific validation. However, in many studies a percentage of participants can be defined as ‘non-responders’ and scientists are beginning to unravel what differentiates these from ‘responders;’ and it is now clear that an individual’s baseline microbiota can influence an individual’s response. Thus, microbiome composition can potentially serve as a biomarker to predict responsiveness to interventions, diets and dietary components enabling greater opportunities for its use towards disease prevention and health promotion. In Part I of this two-part review, we reviewed the current state of the science in terms of the gut microbiota and the role of diet and dietary components in shaping it and subsequent consequences for human health. In Part II, we examine the efficacy of gut-microbiota modulating therapies at different life stages and their potential to aid in the management of undernutrition and overnutrition. Given the significance of an individual’s gut microbiota, we investigate the feasibility of microbiome testing and we discuss guidelines for evaluating the scientific validity of evidence for providing personalised microbiome-based dietary advice. Overall, this review highlights the potential value of the microbiome to prevent disease and maintain or promote health and in doing so, paves the pathway towards commercialisation. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher MDPI AG en
dc.relation.uri https://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/11/7/1468/htm
dc.rights ©2019 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Personalised nutrition en
dc.subject Precision nutrition en
dc.subject Probiotics en
dc.subject Prebiotics en
dc.subject Gut microbiome en
dc.subject Immunity en
dc.subject Metabolic disease en
dc.subject Gut en
dc.subject Genetics en
dc.title Precision nutrition and the microbiome part ii: Potential opportunities and pathways to commercialisation en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Catherine Stanton, APC Microbiome Ireland, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: catherine.stanton@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Nutrients en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress catherine.stanton@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid 1468 en
dc.identifier.eissn 2072-6643


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

©2019 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as ©2019 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
This website uses cookies. By using this website, you consent to the use of cookies in accordance with the UCC Privacy and Cookies Statement. For more information about cookies and how you can disable them, visit our Privacy and Cookies statement