Adaptive and interactive climate futures: systematic review of 'serious games' for engagement and decision-making

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Flood, Stephen
dc.contributor.author Cradock-Henry, Nicholas A.
dc.contributor.author Blackett, Paula
dc.contributor.author Edwards, Peter
dc.date.accessioned 2019-09-24T11:10:18Z
dc.date.available 2019-09-24T11:10:18Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.citation Flood, S., Cradock-Henry, N. A., Blackett, P. and Edwards, P. (2018) 'Adaptive and interactive climate futures: systematic review of ‘serious games’ for engagement and decision-making', Environmental Research Letters, 13(6): 063005, (20pp.) DOI: 10.1088/1748-9326/aac1c6 en
dc.identifier.volume 13 en
dc.identifier.issued 6 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 20 en
dc.identifier.issn 1748-9326
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/8604
dc.identifier.doi 10.1088/1748-9326/aac1c6 en
dc.description.abstract Climate change is already having adverse impacts on ecosystems, communities and economic activities through higher temperatures, prolonged droughts, and more frequent extremes. However, a gap remains between public understanding, scientific knowledge about climate change, and changes in behaviour to effect adaptation. 'Serious games' - games used for purposes other than entertainment - are one way to reduce this adaptation deficit by enhancing opportunities for social learning and enabling positive action. Games can provide communities with the opportunity to interactively explore different climate futures, build capability and capacity for dealing with complex challenges, and socialise adaptation priorities with diverse publics. Using systematic review methods, this paper identifies, reviews, synthesises and assesses the literature on serious games for climate change adaptation. To determine where and how impact is achieved, we draw on an evaluation framework grounded in social learning, to assess which combinations of cognitive (knowledge and thinking), normative (norms and approaches) and relational (how people connect and network building) learning are achieved. Results show that factors influencing the overall success in influencing behaviour and catalysing learning for adaptation include generating high levels of inter- and intra- level trust between researchers, practitioners and community participants; strong debriefing and evaluation practices; and the use of experienced and knowledgeable facilitators. These results can help inform future game design, and research methodologies to develop robust ways for engaging with stakeholders and end users, and enhance learning effects for resilient climate futures. en
dc.description.sponsorship Ministry for Business Innovation and Employment (Resilience to Nature's Challenges, National Science Challenge, Strategic Science Investment Fund, Manaaki Whenua Landcare Research) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher IOP Publishing en
dc.relation.uri https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1748-9326/aac1c6
dc.rights © 2018 The Author(s). Published by IOP Publishing Ltd. Original content from this work may be used under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 licence. Any further distributionof this work must maintain attribution to the author(s) and the title of the work, journal citation and DOI. en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ en
dc.subject Climate change adaptation en
dc.subject Social learning en
dc.subject Serious games en
dc.subject Climate services en
dc.subject Decision-making en
dc.title Adaptive and interactive climate futures: systematic review of 'serious games' for engagement and decision-making en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Stephen Flood, Eri, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: stephen.flood@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2019-09-24T10:52:55Z
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.rssid 499776002
dc.contributor.funder Resilience to Nature's Challenges en
dc.contributor.funder Ministry for Business Innovation and Employment en
dc.contributor.funder Strategic Science Investment Fund en
dc.contributor.funder Manaaki Whenua Landcare Research en
dc.contributor.funder Natural Hazards Research Platform en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Environmental Research Letters en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked No
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress stephen.flood@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid 063005 en


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

© 2018 The Author(s). Published by IOP Publishing Ltd. Original content from this work may be used under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 licence. Any further distributionof this work must maintain attribution to the author(s) and the title of the work, journal citation and DOI. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2018 The Author(s). Published by IOP Publishing Ltd. Original content from this work may be used under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 licence. Any further distributionof this work must maintain attribution to the author(s) and the title of the work, journal citation and DOI.
This website uses cookies. By using this website, you consent to the use of cookies in accordance with the UCC Privacy and Cookies Statement. For more information about cookies and how you can disable them, visit our Privacy and Cookies statement