Use of lactic acid bacteria to reduce methane production in ruminants, a critical review

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dc.contributor.author Doyle, Natasha
dc.contributor.author Mbandlwa, Philiswa
dc.contributor.author Kelly, William J.
dc.contributor.author Attwood, Graeme
dc.contributor.author Li, Yang
dc.contributor.author Ross, R. Paul
dc.contributor.author Stanton, Catherine
dc.contributor.author Leahy, Sinead
dc.date.accessioned 2019-10-14T21:11:31Z
dc.date.available 2019-10-14T21:11:31Z
dc.date.issued 2019-09-09
dc.identifier.citation Doyle, N., Mbandlwa, P., Kelly, W. J., Attwood, G., Li, Y., Ross, R. P., Stanton, C. and Leahy, S. (2019) 'Use of Lactic Acid Bacteria to Reduce Methane Production in Ruminants, a Critical Review', Frontiers in Microbiology, 10, 2207 (13pp.) DOI: 10.3389/fmicb.2019.02207 en
dc.identifier.volume 10 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 13 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/8748
dc.identifier.doi 10.3389/fmicb.2019.02207 en
dc.description.abstract Enteric fermentation in ruminants is the single largest anthropogenic source of agricultural methane and has a significant role in global warming. Consequently, innovative solutions to reduce methane emissions from livestock farming are required to ensure future sustainable food production. One possible approach is the use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), Gram positive bacteria that produce lactic acid as a major end product of carbohydrate fermentation. LAB are natural inhabitants of the intestinal tract of mammals and are among the most important groups of microorganisms used in food fermentations. LAB can be readily isolated from ruminant animals and are currently used on-farm as direct-fed microbials (DFMs) and as silage inoculants. While it has been proposed that LAB can be used to reduce methane production in ruminant livestock, so far research has been limited, and convincing animal data to support the concept are lacking. This review has critically evaluated the current literature and provided a comprehensive analysis and summary of the potential use and mechanisms of LAB as a methane mitigation strategy. It is clear that although there are some promising results, more research is needed to identify whether the use of LAB can be an effective methane mitigation option for ruminant livestock. en
dc.description.sponsorship New Zealand Government (FACCE ERA-GAS METHLAB project); Teagasc (Walsh Fellowship) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Frontiers Media en
dc.relation.uri https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmicb.2019.02207/full
dc.rights ©2019 Doyle, Mbandlwa, Kelly, Attwood, Li, Ross, Stanton and Leahy. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Lactic acid bacteria en
dc.subject Methane en
dc.subject Methanogens en
dc.subject Bacteriocins en
dc.subject Direct-fed microbials en
dc.subject Silage inoculants en
dc.subject Mitigation en
dc.title Use of lactic acid bacteria to reduce methane production in ruminants, a critical review en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Paul Ross, School of Microbiology, APC Microbiome Ireland, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email:p.ross@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.contributor.funder Teagasc en
dc.contributor.funder European Commission en
dc.contributor.funder New Zealand Government en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Frontiers in Microbiology en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress p.ross@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid 2207 en
dc.relation.project info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/H2020::ERA-NET-Cofund/696356/EU/ERA-NET for Monitoring and Mitigation of Greenhouse Gases from Agri- and Silvi-Culture/ERA-GAS en
dc.identifier.eissn 1664-302X


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©2019 Doyle, Mbandlwa, Kelly, Attwood, Li, Ross, Stanton and Leahy. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as ©2019 Doyle, Mbandlwa, Kelly, Attwood, Li, Ross, Stanton and Leahy. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
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