The rumen microbiome: A crucial consideration when optimising milk and meat production and nitrogen utilisation efficiency

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dc.contributor.author Matthews, Chloe
dc.contributor.author Crispie, Fiona
dc.contributor.author Lewis, Eva
dc.contributor.author Reid, Michael
dc.contributor.author O'Toole, Paul W.
dc.contributor.author Cotter, Paul D.
dc.date.accessioned 2019-10-28T06:47:11Z
dc.date.available 2019-10-28T06:47:11Z
dc.date.issued 2018-09-12
dc.identifier.citation Matthews, C., Crispie, F., Lewis, E., Reid, M., O’Toole, P.W. and Cotter, P.D., 2019. The rumen microbiome: a crucial consideration when optimising milk and meat production and nitrogen utilisation efficiency. Gut microbes, 10(2), pp. 115-132. DOI:10.1080/19490976.2018.1505176 en
dc.identifier.volume 10 en
dc.identifier.issued 2 en
dc.identifier.startpage 115 en
dc.identifier.endpage 132 en
dc.identifier.issn 1949-0976
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/8887
dc.identifier.doi 10.1080/19490976.2018.1505176 en
dc.description.abstract Methane is generated in the foregut of all ruminant animals by the microorganisms present. Dietary manipulation is regarded as the most effective and most convenient way to reduce methane emissions (and in turn energy loss in the animal) and increase nitrogen utilization efficiency. This review examines the impact of diet on bovine rumen function and outlines what is known about the rumen microbiome. Our understanding of this area has increased significantly in recent years due to the application of omics technologies to determine microbial composition and functionality patterns in the rumen. This information can be combined with data on nutrition, rumen physiology, nitrogen excretion and/or methane emission to provide comprehensive insights into the relationship between rumen microbial activity, nitrogen utilisation efficiency and methane emission, with an ultimate view to the development of new and improved intervention strategies. en
dc.description.sponsorship Teagasc (Walsh Fellowship scheme); Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine (Stimulus Fund (11/sf/309)Walsh Fellowship Scheme/ DAFM Stimulus Fund [11/sf/309]) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Taylor & Francis Group en
dc.relation.uri https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/19490976.2018.1505176
dc.rights © 2018 The Author(s). Published with license by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, and is not altered, transformed, or built upon in any way. en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ en
dc.subject Rumen en
dc.subject Genomics en
dc.subject Culture independent en
dc.subject Microbiome en
dc.subject Shotgun en
dc.title The rumen microbiome: A crucial consideration when optimising milk and meat production and nitrogen utilisation efficiency en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Paul Cotter, Teagasc Food Research Centre, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: paul.cotter@teagasc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.contributor.funder Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine en
dc.contributor.funder Teagasc en
dc.contributor.funder Nutribio en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Gut Microbes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress paul.cotter@teagasc.ie en
dc.identifier.eissn 1949-0984


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©  2018 The Author(s). Published with license by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, and is not altered, transformed, or built upon in any way. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2018 The Author(s). Published with license by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, and is not altered, transformed, or built upon in any way.
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