The musculoskeletal consequences of latissmus dorsi breast reconstruction in women following mastectomy for breast cancer

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dc.contributor.author Blackburn, Nicole E.
dc.contributor.author Mc Veigh, Joseph G.
dc.contributor.author Mc Caughan, Eilis M.
dc.contributor.author Kennedy, Richard D.
dc.contributor.author McIntosh, Stuart A.
dc.contributor.author Wilson, Iseult M.
dc.date.accessioned 2019-10-28T07:55:09Z
dc.date.available 2019-10-28T07:55:09Z
dc.date.issued 2018-08-28
dc.identifier.citation Blackburn, N.E., Mc Veigh, J.G., Mc Caughan, E.M., Kennedy, R.D., McIntosh, S.A. and Wilson, I.M., 2018. The musculoskeletal consequences of latissmus dorsi breast reconstruction in women following mastectomy for breast cancer. PloS one, 13(8), e0202859., (17 pp.). DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0202859 en
dc.identifier.volume 13 en
dc.identifier.issued 8 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 17 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/8901
dc.identifier.doi 10.1371/journal.pone.0202859 en
dc.description.abstract Introduction: Current evidence suggests that patients who have latissimus dorsi (LD) breast reconstruction following mastectomy for breast cancer can experience long-term shoulder dysfunction. However, as there is no standardised assessment or follow-up period within the literature, findings are conflicting. This research aimed to investigate the impact on daily living of immediate and delayed LD breast reconstruction in women following mastectomy for breast cancer. Methods: Both qualitative and quantitative methods of enquiry were used. A focus group study explored the musculoskeletal consequences of surgery as perceived by the women (n = 15) and their healthcare professionals (n = 11). A questionnaire survey was administered (n = 159), including a range of outcome measures to quantify both the physical and psychosocial impact of LD breast reconstruction. Dyad interviews were also conducted in order to determine the impact of surgery on function and activities of daily living (ADL) from the woman’s perspective and that of her significant other (n = 8). Results: The qualitative studies highlighted a lack of preparedness and unrealistic expectations regarding functional recovery among women and their significant others’. Post-surgery it was apparent that women weighed up reduced shoulder function against survival, demonstrating resilience in their approach to coping with this adaptive way of living. The survey identified low to moderate effect on the outcomes assessed (n = 159), however, node removal significantly impacted certain aspects of quality of life (p<0.05) and disability (p = 0.04). Conclusions: Breast reconstruction using the LD had an impact on shoulder function and some ADL, which impacted not only on the women but also family and significant others. Despite the functional implications associated with surgery, findings would suggest that shoulder dysfunction is not their main concern. This work identified that women and their significant other require further information to clarify expectation regarding recovery, highlighting the changing priorities of women throughout their journey from diagnosis into long-term recovery. en
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Employment and Learning, Northern Ireland (author's studentship) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher PLoS en
dc.relation.uri https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0202859
dc.rights © 2018 Blackburn et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Breast reconstruction en
dc.subject Mastectomy en
dc.subject Cancer treatment en
dc.subject Cancer detection en
dc.subject Flap surgery en
dc.title The musculoskeletal consequences of latissmus dorsi breast reconstruction in women following mastectomy for breast cancer en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Joseph Mc Veigh, School of Clinical Therapies, College of Medicine and Health, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: joseph.mcveigh@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.contributor.funder Department of Employment and Learning, Northern Ireland en
dc.contributor.funder Cancer Focus Northern Ireland en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle PLoS ONE en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress joseph.mcveigh@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid e0202859 en
dc.identifier.eissn 1932-6203


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© 2018 Blackburn et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2018 Blackburn et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited
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