Are pre-service teachers’ beliefs toward curricular outcomes challenged by teaching methods modules and school placement? Evidence from three Greek physical education faculties

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dc.contributor.author Adamakis, Manolis
dc.contributor.author Dania, Aspasia
dc.date.accessioned 2019-10-29T10:29:23Z
dc.date.available 2019-10-29T10:29:23Z
dc.date.issued 2019-10-15
dc.identifier.citation Adamakis, M. and Dania, A. (2019) 'Are pre-service teachers’ beliefs toward curricular outcomes challenged by teaching methods modules and school placement? Evidence from three Greek physical education faculties', European Physical Education Review, doi: 10.1177/1356336X19880574 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 18 en
dc.identifier.issn 1356-336X
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/8909
dc.identifier.doi 10.1177/1356336X19880574 en
dc.description.abstract Current research on physical education teacher education (PETE) has shown that pre-service teachers’ beliefs concerning the scope of physical education (PE) remain highly influential during their studies. However, undergraduate programmes seem to have a limited effect on pre-service teachers’ teaching priorities, and this situation is left unchallenged. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to examine the impact of two PE teaching methods modules, which included school placement experiences, over one academic year, on pre-service PE teachers’ belief systems towards four important curricular outcomes. A total of 373 undergraduate pre-service teachers (238 males, 135 females; mean = 21.02, standard deviation = 2.33 years) from three major Greek faculties of PE and sport science twice completed a previously validated four-factor instrument. The results indicated that pre-service teachers shared some similar beliefs about the outcome goals of PE, as they all classified physical activity and fitness as the most important one. The teaching methods modules had a positive impact on their beliefs, which were reinforced; however, their classification did not change over time. Both teaching- and coaching-oriented pre-service teachers classified the curricular outcomes in an identical way. Data suggested that PETE recruits prioritized the fitness learning outcomes, and this was in alignment with utilitarian approaches proposed recently in PE, which forward measurable PE learning outcomes. Also, participants preferred to hold and reinforce their personal belief structures and were not willing to change them, complying with faculty staff dispositions. Implications of these findings and recommendations for more effective school placement experiences are discussed. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Sage Publications en
dc.relation.uri https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1356336X19880574
dc.rights © The Author(s) 2019. Reprinted by permission of SAGE Publications. The published article is available at https://doi.org/10.1177/1356336X19880574 en
dc.subject Students’ beliefs en
dc.subject PETE en
dc.subject Teaching-coaching en
dc.subject Field-based experiences en
dc.subject Physical education en
dc.subject Practicum en
dc.subject Methods course en
dc.title Are pre-service teachers’ beliefs toward curricular outcomes challenged by teaching methods modules and school placement? Evidence from three Greek physical education faculties en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Manolis Adamakis, School of Education, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000, emmanouil.adamakis@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle European Physical Education Review en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress emmanouil.adamakis@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.bibliocheck In press. Check vol / issue / page range. Update citation, rights statement en
dc.identifier.eissn 1741-2749


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