Evidence for plasmid-mediated salt tolerance in the human gut microbiome and potential mechanisms

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dc.contributor.author Broaders, Eileen
dc.contributor.author O'Brien, Ciarán
dc.contributor.author Gahan, Cormac G. M.
dc.contributor.author Marchesi, Julian R.
dc.date.accessioned 2019-11-01T07:35:35Z
dc.date.available 2019-11-01T07:35:35Z
dc.date.issued 2016-02-04
dc.identifier.citation Broaders, E., O’Brien, C., Gahan, C. G. M. and Marchesi, J. R. (2016) 'Evidence for plasmid-mediated salt tolerance in the human gut microbiome and potential mechanisms', FEMS Microbiology Ecology, 92(3), fiw019. (8pp.) DOI: 10.1093/femsec/fiw019 en
dc.identifier.volume 92 en
dc.identifier.issued 3 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 8 en
dc.identifier.issn 0168-6496
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/8935
dc.identifier.doi 10.1093/femsec/fiw019 en
dc.description.abstract The human gut microbiome is critical to health and wellbeing. It hosts a complex ecosystem comprising a multitude of bacterial species, which contributes functionality that would otherwise be absent from the host. Transient and commensal bacteria in the gut must withstand many stresses. The influence of mobile genetic elements such as plasmids in stress adaptation within the ecosystem is poorly understood. Using a mobilomic approach we found evidence for plasmid-mediated osmotolerance as a phenotype amongst the Proteobacteria in healthy faecal slurries. A transconjugant carrying multiple plasmids acquired from healthy faecal slurry demonstrated increased osmotolerance in the presence of metal salts, particularly potassium chloride, which was not evident in the recipient. Pyrosequencing and analysis of the total plasmid DNA demonstrated the presence of plasmid-borne osmotolerance systems (including KdpD and H-NS) which may be linked to the observed phenotype. This is the first report of a transferable osmotolerance phenotype in gut commensals and may have implications for the transfer of osmotolerance in other niches. en
dc.description.sponsorship Science Foundation Ireland (Centres for Engineering Science and Technology program) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Oxford University Press en
dc.relation.uri https://academic.oup.com/femsec/article/92/3/fiw019/2470104
dc.rights ©FEMS 2016. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Gut en
dc.subject Microbiome en
dc.subject Mobile genetic elements en
dc.subject Osmotolerance en
dc.title Evidence for plasmid-mediated salt tolerance in the human gut microbiome and potential mechanisms en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Cormac Gahan, School of Pharmacy, Department of Microbiology and Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email:c.gahan@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.contributor.funder Science Foundation Ireland en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle FEMS Microbiology Ecology en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress c.gahan@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid fiw019 en
dc.identifier.eissn 1574-6941


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©FEMS 2016. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as ©FEMS 2016. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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