Multiple exposures: moving bodies and choreographies of protest in contemporary Catalonia

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dc.contributor.author Buffery, Helena
dc.date.accessioned 2019-11-08T15:23:57Z
dc.date.available 2019-11-08T15:23:57Z
dc.date.issued 2018-11
dc.identifier.citation Buffery, H. (2018) 'Multiple Exposures: Moving Bodies and Choreographies of Protest in Contemporary Catalonia', Performance Matters, 4(3), pp. 7-29. en
dc.identifier.volume 19 en
dc.identifier.issued 3 en
dc.identifier.startpage 7 en
dc.identifier.endpage 29 en
dc.identifier.issn 2369-2537
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/8981
dc.description.abstract This article explores the significance of the moving body in contemporary Catalan culture, specifically by reading cross-disciplinary reframing of the dancer’s body in relation to the increasing deployment and visibility of choreographies of protest (Foster 2003) in urban social movements, demonstrations and public assemblies such as those galvanized by the pro-Independence movement. After careful consideration of the relationship between dance and genealogies of protest in Catalonia, the article will outline the different ways in which contemporary dance has interacted with contemporary Catalan theatre culture, before going on to focus more closely on disentangling the different aesthetic, political, and ethical rationale and effects of the recent mobilization of the dancer’s body beyond the spaces of the contemporary dance circuit. Reflecting on how the dancer’s body functions in three recent (2014–2017) shows witnessed in Barcelona—Àlex Rigola’s adaptation of Joan Sales’s novel Incerta Glòria (Uncertain Glory) at the Teatre Nacional de Catalunya, Carme Portaceli’s staging of the testimonies of women victims of Francoist violence during and after the Spanish Civil War, as recovered and reframed by feminist historian Carme Domingo, in Només són dones/Solo son mujeres (They’re only Women) at the Josep Maria de Sagarra theatre in Santa Coloma de Gramenet, and Sol Picó’s collaborative, processual work with women dancers and musicians of diverse cultural origins in WW–We Women at the Mercat de les Flors—I aim to articulate how they function as choreographies of protest: plotting the different modes of subjectivation enacted and their relationship to narratives of individual, social and cultural vulnerability, precarity and trauma in the contemporary Catalan space. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Simon Fraser University en
dc.relation.uri https://performancematters-thejournal.com/index.php/pm/article/view/123
dc.rights © 2019 Helena Buffery. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ en
dc.subject Catalan theatre en
dc.subject Choreography en
dc.subject Urban social protest en
dc.title Multiple exposures: moving bodies and choreographies of protest in contemporary Catalonia en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Helena Buffery, Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: h.buffery@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2019-11-06T15:51:20Z
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.internal.rssid 499911191
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Performance Matters en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked No
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress h.buffery@ucc.ie en


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© 2019 Helena Buffery. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2019 Helena Buffery. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
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