Two fallacies in comparisons between humans and non-humans

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dc.contributor.author Ross, Don
dc.date.accessioned 2019-11-20T06:09:03Z
dc.date.available 2019-11-20T06:09:03Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.citation Ross, D., 2018. Two fallacies in comparisons between humans and non-humans. Animal Sentience, 3(23), (13). en
dc.identifier.volume 3 en
dc.identifier.issued 23 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 3 en
dc.identifier.issn 2377-7478
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/9162
dc.description.abstract The hypothesis that humans are superior to non-humans by virtue of higher cognitive powers is often supported by two recurrent fallacies: (1) that any competence shown by humans but not by our closest living relatives (apes) must be unique to humans; and (2) that grades of intelligence can be inferred from behavior without regard to motivational structures. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Humane Society Institute for Science and Policy (HSISP) en
dc.relation.uri https://animalstudiesrepository.org/animsent/vol3/iss23/13/
dc.rights © The Author(s) 2018 en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ en
dc.subject Human cultural traditions en
dc.subject Human behaviour en
dc.subject Non-human en
dc.subject Superiority en
dc.subject Cognition and perception en
dc.title Two fallacies in comparisons between humans and non-humans en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Don Ross, School of Sociology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: don.ross@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Animal Sentience en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress don.ross@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid 13 en


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