Aggregating the conceptualisation of movement data better captures real world and simulated animal-environment relationships

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dc.contributor.author Holloway, Paul
dc.date.accessioned 2019-11-21T16:55:49Z
dc.date.available 2019-11-21T16:55:49Z
dc.date.issued 2019-05-29
dc.identifier.citation Holloway, P. (2019) 'Aggregating the conceptualization of movement data better captures real world and simulated animal–environment relationships', International Journal of Geographical Information Science. doi: 10.1080/13658816.2019.1618464 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 22 en
dc.identifier.issn 1365-8816
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/9174
dc.identifier.doi 10.1080/13658816.2019.1618464 en
dc.description.abstract Habitat selection analysis is a widely applied statistical framework used in spatial ecology. Many of the methods used to generate movement and couple it with the environment are strongly integrated within GIScience. The choice of movement conceptualisation and environmental space can potentially have long-lasting implications on the spatial statistics used to infer movement–environment relationships. The aim of this study was to explore how systematically altering the conceptualisation of movement, environmental space and temporal resolution affects the results of habitat selection analyses using both real-world case studies and a virtual ecologist approach. Model performance and coefficient estimates did not differ between the finest conceptualisations of movement (e.g. vector and move), while substantial differences were found for the more aggregated representations (e.g. segment and area). Only segments modelled the expected movement–environment relationship with increasing linear feature resistance in the virtual ecologist approach and altering the temporal resolution identified inversions in the movement–environment relationship for vectors and moves. The results suggest that spatial statistics employed to investigate movement–environment relationships should advance beyond conceptualising movement as the (relatively) static conceptualisation of vectors and moves and replace these with (more) dynamic aggregations of longer-lasting movement processes such as segments and areal representations. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Taylor & Francis en
dc.rights © 2019 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in International Journal of Geographical Information Science on 29 May 2019, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/13658816.2019.1618464 en
dc.subject Habitat selection en
dc.subject Movement en
dc.subject Segments en
dc.subject Trajectories en
dc.subject Virtual ecology en
dc.title Aggregating the conceptualisation of movement data better captures real world and simulated animal-environment relationships en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Paul Holloway, Geography, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: paul.holloway@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.check.info Access to this article is restricted until 12 months after publication by request of the publisher. en
dc.check.date 2020-05-29
dc.date.updated 2019-11-21T16:48:59Z
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.internal.rssid 486903162
dc.contributor.funder University College Cork en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle International Journal of Geographical Information Science en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked No
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress paul.holloway@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.bibliocheck In press. Check vol / issue / page range. Amend citation as necessary. en
dc.relation.project University College Cork (College of Arts, Celtic Studies and Social Science Research Support Fund) en


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