Dress to impress: parents’ fears of allegations of fabricated induced illness in cases when their child has Mitochondrial disease - exploring the voices of MITO Families Ireland

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dc.contributor.advisor O'Suilleabhain, Fiachra en
dc.contributor.author O'Sullivan, Phil
dc.contributor.other Mito Families Ireland
dc.contributor.role Civil Society Organization en
dc.date.accessioned 2019-11-26T12:39:06Z
dc.date.available 2019-11-26T12:39:06Z
dc.date.issued 2018-04-19
dc.identifier.citation O’Sullivan, P. (2018) Dress to impress: parents’ fears of allegations of fabricated induced illness in cases when their child has Mitochondrial disease - exploring the voices of MITO Families Ireland. Cork: Community-Academic Research Links, University College Cork. en
dc.identifier.endpage 67 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/9254
dc.description.abstract This study explores parents’ fears of fabricated induced illness in their children who suffer from a mitochondrial disease. The paper will focus on understanding and appreciating the many concerns associated to parenting a child who suffers from a rare life limiting disease, an exploration of the role social work has played in their lives is also a focus of this research. The fear of false allegations of fabricated induced illness exacerbates the complexities already involved in parenting a child with a rare disease. The research implemented small-scale qualitative interviews with three mothers from the collaborating community group ‘Mito Families Ireland’. The qualitative method enabled a through and descriptive review of the issues parents experience when their child has a mitochondrial disease. The absence of literature further complicates the area, thus it was essential to utilise primary research methods which gave in-depth analysis of such a complex and contested area for parents and professionals alike. The results paint a negative portrayal of social work, as well as the parent-professional relationship when a mitochondrial disease is involved. Furthermore, the parents highlight the role of social work whilst describing its perception amongst parents in contemporary Ireland. An emerging theme provided the inspiration for the title of this paper, where the notion of ‘power dressing’ was both a unique yet fascinating insight into the parent-professional dynamic. A variety of recommendations were offered in concluding the paper, where the implications for social work practice were briefly outlined. It is envisaged these recommendations may inform policy and practice moving forward. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Community-Academic Research Links, University College Cork en
dc.relation.ispartofseries CARL Research Reports;79
dc.relation.uri https://www.ucc.ie/en/scishop/rr/
dc.rights ©2018, Phil O’Sullivan. en
dc.subject Fabricated induced illness en
dc.subject Fears of allegations en
dc.subject Mitochondrial disease en
dc.subject MITO Families Ireland en
dc.subject Rare life limiting disease en
dc.subject Absence of literature en
dc.subject Negative portrayal of social work en
dc.subject Parent-professional relationship en
dc.title Dress to impress: parents’ fears of allegations of fabricated induced illness in cases when their child has Mitochondrial disease - exploring the voices of MITO Families Ireland en
dc.type Report en
dc.type.qualificationname Master of Social Work, Year 2 en
dc.type.qualificationname
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.description.status Not peer reviewed en
dc.internal.placepublication Cork en


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