Metabolism of the predominant human milk oligosaccharide fucosyllactose by an infant gut commensal

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dc.contributor.author James, Kieran
dc.contributor.author Bottacini, Francesca
dc.contributor.author Contreras, Jose Ivan Serrano
dc.contributor.author Vigoureux, Mariane
dc.contributor.author Egan, Muireann
dc.contributor.author Motherway, Mary O’Connell
dc.contributor.author Holmes, Elaine
dc.contributor.author van Sinderen, Douwe
dc.date.accessioned 2019-12-04T10:30:53Z
dc.date.available 2019-12-04T10:30:53Z
dc.date.issued 2019-10-28
dc.identifier.citation James, K., Bottacini, F., Contreras, J. I. S., Vigoureux, M., Egan, M., Motherway, M. O. c., Holmes, E. and van Sinderen, D. (2019) 'Metabolism of the predominant human milk oligosaccharide fucosyllactose by an infant gut commensal', Scientific Reports, 9(1), 15427. (20pp.) doi: 10.1038/s41598-019-51901-7 en
dc.identifier.volume 9 en
dc.identifier.issued 1 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 20 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/9313
dc.identifier.doi 10.1038/s41598-019-51901-7 en
dc.description.abstract A number of bifidobacterial species are found at a particularly high prevalence and abundance in faecal samples of healthy breastfed infants, a phenomenon that is believed to be, at least partially, due to the ability of bifidobacteria to metabolize Human Milk Oligosaccharides (HMOs). In the current study, we isolated a novel strain of Bifidobacterium kashiwanohense, named APCKJ1, from the faeces of a four-week old breastfed infant, based on the ability of the strain to utilise the HMO component fucosyllactose. We then determined the full genome sequence of this strain, and employed the generated data to analyze fucosyllactose metabolism in B. kashiwanohense APCKJ1. Transcriptomic and growth analyses, combined with metabolite analysis, in vitro hydrolysis assays and heterologous expression, allowed us to elucidate the pathway for fucosyllactose metabolism in B. kashiwanohense APCKJ1. Homologs of the key genes for this metabolic pathway were identified in particular in infant-derived members of the Bifdobacterium genus, revealing the apparent niche-specific nature of this pathway, and allowing a broad perspective on bifidobacterial fucosyllactose and L-fucose metabolism. en
dc.description.sponsorship Mizutani Foundation for Glycoscience (ref no. 190049); Irish Research Council (ID GOIPG/2013/651); HRB (Grant No. PDTM/20011/9); FEMS Research Grant (FEMS-RG-2016-0103) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Springer Nature en
dc.relation.uri https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-73762-1
dc.rights © The Author(s) 2019. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Bacterial genomics en
dc.subject Cellular microbiology en
dc.subject Metabolism en
dc.title Metabolism of the predominant human milk oligosaccharide fucosyllactose by an infant gut commensal en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Douwe van Sinderen, School of Microbiology and APC Mircobiome Ireland, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email:d.vansinderen@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.contributor.funder Mizutani Foundation for Glycoscience en
dc.contributor.funder Irish Research Council en
dc.contributor.funder Science Foundation Ireland en
dc.contributor.funder Health Research Board en
dc.contributor.funder Federation of European Microbiological Societies en
dc.contributor.funder European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases en
dc.contributor.funder National Institute for Health Research en
dc.contributor.funder NIHR Imperial Biomedical Research Centre en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Scientific Reports en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress d.vansinderen@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress kieran.james@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid 15427 en
dc.relation.project info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/SFI/SFI Research Centres/12/RC/2273/IE/Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre (APC) - Interfacing Food & Medicine/ en
dc.identifier.eissn 2045-2322


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© The Author(s) 2019. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © The Author(s) 2019. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
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