Cholestasis induced by bile duct ligation promotes changes in the intestinal microbiome in mice

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dc.contributor.author Cabrera-Rubio, Raul
dc.contributor.author Patterson, Angela M.
dc.contributor.author Cotter, Paul D.
dc.contributor.author Beraza, Naiara
dc.date.accessioned 2019-12-05T10:11:44Z
dc.date.available 2019-12-05T10:11:44Z
dc.date.issued 2019-08-23
dc.identifier.citation Cabrera-Rubio, R., Patterson, A. M., Cotter, P. D. and Beraza, N. (2019) 'Cholestasis induced by bile duct ligation promotes changes in the intestinal microbiome in mice', Scientific Reports, 9(1), 12324. (10pp.) doi: 10.1038/s41598-019-48784-z en
dc.identifier.volume 9 en
dc.identifier.issued 1 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 10 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/9335
dc.identifier.doi 10.1038/s41598-019-48784-z en
dc.description.abstract Increasing evidence point to the relevance of intestinal disfunction and changes in the microbiome composition during chronic liver disease. More specifically, recent studies have highlighted that cholestatic diseases associate with a reduction in the microbiome diversity in patients. Still, the dynamics of the changes in the microbiome composition observed, as well as their implication in contributing to the pathogenesis of this disease remain largely undefined. Hence, experimental mouse models resembling the human pathogenesis are crucial to move forward our understanding on the mechanisms underpinning cholestatic disease and to enable the development of effective therapeutics. Our results show that the bile duct ligation (BDL) experimental model of cholestasis leads to rapid and significant changes in the microbiome diversity, with more than 100 OTUs being significantly different in faecal samples obtained from WT mice at 3 days and 7 days after BDL when compared to control animals. Changes in the microbial composition in mice after BDL included the enrichment of Akkermansia, Prevotella, Bacteroides and unclassified Ruminococcaceae in parallel with a drastic reduction of the presence of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii. In conclusion, our results support that bile duct ligation induces changes in the microbiome that partly resemble the gut microbial changes observed during human cholestatic disease. en
dc.description.sponsorship Biological Sciences Research Council (BB/J004529/1, BBS/E/F/00044509, BB/R012490/1, BBS/E/F/000PR10355, BB/CCG1860/1) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Nature Publishing Group en
dc.rights © The Author(s) 2019. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Cholestasis en
dc.subject Microbiology en
dc.subject Bile duct en
dc.subject Intestinal microbiome en
dc.title Cholestasis induced by bile duct ligation promotes changes in the intestinal microbiome in mice en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Paul Cotter, APC Microbiome Institute, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email:paul.cotter@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.contributor.funder Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Scientific Reports en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress paul.cotter@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid 12324 en
dc.identifier.eissn 2045-2322


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© The Author(s) 2019. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © The Author(s) 2019. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
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