Bifidobacterium bifidum: A key member of the early human gut microbiota

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dc.contributor.author Turroni, Francesca
dc.contributor.author Duranti, Sabrina
dc.contributor.author Milani, Christian
dc.contributor.author Lugli, Gabriele Andrea
dc.contributor.author van Sinderen, Douwe
dc.contributor.author Ventura, Marco
dc.date.accessioned 2019-12-05T10:33:52Z
dc.date.available 2019-12-05T10:33:52Z
dc.date.issued 2019-11-09
dc.identifier.citation Turroni, F., Duranti, S., Milani, C., Lugli, G. A., van Sinderen, D. and Ventura, M. (2019) 'Bifidobacterium bifidum: A Key Member of the Early Human Gut Microbiota', Microorganisms, 7(11), 544. (13pp.) doi: 10.3390/microorganisms7110544 en
dc.identifier.volume 7 en
dc.identifier.issued 11 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 13 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/9337
dc.identifier.doi 10.3390/microorganisms7110544 en
dc.description.abstract Bifidobacteria typically represent the most abundant bacteria of the human gut microbiota in healthy breast-fed infants. Members of the Bifidobacterium bifidum species constitute one of the dominant taxa amongst these bifidobacterial communities and have been shown to display notable physiological and genetic features encompassing adhesion to epithelia as well as metabolism of host-derived glycans. In the current review, we discuss current knowledge concerning particular biological characteristics of the B. bifidum species that support its specific adaptation to the human gut and their implications in terms of supporting host health. en
dc.description.sponsorship Science Foundation Ireland (Grant number 15/JP-HDHL/3280, SFI/12/RC/2273-P1 and SFI/12/RC/2273-P2) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher MDPI en
dc.rights ©2019 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Bifidobacterium bifidum en
dc.subject Bifidobacteria en
dc.subject Probiotics en
dc.subject Genomics en
dc.subject Microbiota en
dc.title Bifidobacterium bifidum: A key member of the early human gut microbiota en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Douwe van Sinderen, School of Microbiology and APC Microbiome Institute, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email:d.vansinderen@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.contributor.funder Joint Programming Initiative on Antimicrobial Resistance en
dc.contributor.funder Science Foundation Ireland en
dc.contributor.funder Fondazione Cariparma en
dc.contributor.funder GenProbio srl en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Microorganisms en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress d.vansinderen@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid 544 en
dc.relation.project info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/SFI/SFI Research Centres/12/RC/2273/IE/Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre (APC) - Interfacing Food & Medicine/
dc.identifier.eissn 2076-2607


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©2019 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as ©2019 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
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