Gamma-aminobutyric acid-producing lactobacilli positively affect metabolism and depressive-like behaviour in a mouse model of metabolic syndrome

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dc.contributor.author Patterson, Elaine
dc.contributor.author Ryan, Paul M.
dc.contributor.author Wiley, N.
dc.contributor.author Carafa, Ilaria
dc.contributor.author Sherwin, Eoin
dc.contributor.author Moloney, Gerard M.
dc.contributor.author Franciosi, E.
dc.contributor.author Mandal, R.
dc.contributor.author Wishart, D. S.
dc.contributor.author Tuohy, K.
dc.contributor.author Ross, R. Paul
dc.contributor.author Cryan, John F.
dc.contributor.author Dinan, Timothy G.
dc.contributor.author Stanton, Catherine
dc.date.accessioned 2019-12-05T12:36:01Z
dc.date.available 2019-12-05T12:36:01Z
dc.date.issued 2019-11-08
dc.identifier.citation Patterson, E., Ryan, P. M., Wiley, N., Carafa, I., Sherwin, E., Moloney, G., Franciosi, E., Mandal, R., Wishart, D. S., Tuohy, K., Ross, R. P., Cryan, J. F., Dinan, T. G. and Stanton, C. (2019) 'Gamma-aminobutyric acid-producing lactobacilli positively affect metabolism and depressive-like behaviour in a mouse model of metabolic syndrome', Scientific Reports, 9(1), 16323. (15pp.) doi: 10.1038/s41598-019-51781-x en
dc.identifier.volume 9 en
dc.identifier.issued 1 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 15 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/9345
dc.identifier.doi 10.1038/s41598-019-51781-x en
dc.description.abstract Metabolic and neuroactive metabolite production represents one of the mechanisms through which the gut microbiota can impact health. One such metabolite, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), can modulate glucose homeostasis and alter behavioural patterns in the host. We previously demonstrated that oral administration of GABA-producing Lactobacillus brevis DPC6108 has the potential to increase levels of circulating insulin in healthy rats. Therefore, the objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of endogenous microbial GABA production in improving metabolic and behavioural outcomes in a mouse model of metabolic dysfunction. Diet-induced obese and metabolically dysfunctional mice received one of two GABA-producing strains, L. brevis DPC6108 or L. brevis DSM32386, daily for 12 weeks. After 8 and 10 weeks of intervention, the behavioural and metabolic profiles of the mice were respectively assessed. Intervention with both L. brevis strains attenuated several abnormalities associated with metabolic dysfunction, causing a reduction in the accumulation of mesenteric adipose tissue, increased insulin secretion following glucose challenge, improved plasma cholesterol clearance and reduced despair-like behaviour and basal corticosterone production during the forced swim test. Taken together, this exploratory dataset indicates that intervention with GABA-producing lactobacilli has the potential to improve metabolic and depressive- like behavioural abnormalities associated with metabolic syndrome in mice. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Springer Nature en
dc.rights © The Author(s) 2019. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Metabolic syndrome en
dc.subject Microbiome en
dc.subject Type 2 diabetes en
dc.title Gamma-aminobutyric acid-producing lactobacilli positively affect metabolism and depressive-like behaviour in a mouse model of metabolic syndrome en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Catherine Stanton, APC Microbiome Ireland, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.contributor.funder Science Foundation Ireland en
dc.contributor.funder Teagasc en
dc.contributor.funder University of Alberta en
dc.contributor.funder Ireland Canada University Foundation en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Scientific reports en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress j.cryan@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress p.ross@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress g.moloney@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress t.dinan@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress eoin.sherwin@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid 16323 en
dc.relation.project info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/SFI/SFI Research Centres/12/RC/2273/IE/Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre (APC) - Interfacing Food & Medicine/ en
dc.identifier.eissn 2045-2322


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© The Author(s) 2019. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © The Author(s) 2019. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
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