Computational Commensality: from theories to computational models for social food preparation and consumption in HCI

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dc.contributor.author Niewiadomski, Radoslaw
dc.contributor.author Ceccaldi, Eleonora
dc.contributor.author Huisman, Gijs
dc.contributor.author Volpe, Gualtiero
dc.contributor.author Mancini, Maurizio
dc.date.accessioned 2019-12-10T12:12:52Z
dc.date.available 2019-12-10T12:12:52Z
dc.date.issued 2019-12-05
dc.identifier.citation Niewiadomski, R., Ceccaldi, E., Huisman, G., Volpe, G. and Mancini, M. (2019) 'Computational Commensality: From Theories to Computational Models for Social Food Preparation and Consumption in HCI', Frontiers in Robotics and AI, 6, 119 (19pp). doi: 10.3389/frobt.2019.00119 en
dc.identifier.volume 6 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 19 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/9382
dc.identifier.doi 10.3389/frobt.2019.00119 en
dc.description.abstract Food and eating are inherently social activities taking place, for example, around the dining table at home, in restaurants, or in public spaces. Enjoying eating with others, often referred to as “commensality,” positively affects mealtime in terms of, among other factors, food intake, food choice, and food satisfaction. In this paper we discuss the concept of “Computational Commensality,” that is, technology which computationally addresses various social aspects of food and eating. In the past few years, Human-Computer Interaction started to address how interactive technologies can improve mealtimes. However, the main focus has been made so far on improving the individual's experience, rather than considering the inherently social nature of food consumption. In this survey, we first present research from the field of social psychology on the social relevance of Food- and Eating-related Activities (F&EA). Then, we review existing computational models and technologies that can contribute, in the near future, to achieving Computational Commensality. We also discuss the related research challenges and indicate future applications of such new technology that can potentially improve F&EA from the commensality perspective. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Frontiers Media en
dc.rights © 2019, Niewiadomski, Ceccaldi, Huisman, Volpe and Mancini. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Commensality en
dc.subject Food en
dc.subject Food recognition en
dc.subject HCI en
dc.subject Social signal processing en
dc.subject Embodied interfaces en
dc.subject Social robots en
dc.subject Augmented experience en
dc.title Computational Commensality: from theories to computational models for social food preparation and consumption in HCI en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Maurizio Mancini, School of Computer Science and Information Technology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email:m.mancini@cs.ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Frontiers in Robotics and AI en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress m.mancini@cs.ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid 119 en
dc.identifier.eissn 2296-9144


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© 2019, Niewiadomski, Ceccaldi, Huisman, Volpe and Mancini. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2019, Niewiadomski, Ceccaldi, Huisman, Volpe and Mancini. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
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