Understanding teacher collaboration in disadvantaged urban primary schools: uncovering practices that foster professional learning communities

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dc.contributor.advisor Conway, Paul F.
dc.contributor.author McCarthy, Jacinta
dc.date.accessioned 2013-01-30T15:29:56Z
dc.date.available 2013-01-30T15:29:56Z
dc.date.issued 2011-05
dc.date.submitted 2011
dc.identifier.citation McCarthy, J. 2011. Understanding teacher collaboration in disadvantaged urban primary schools: uncovering practices that foster professional learning communities. PhD Thesis, University College Cork. en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/950
dc.description.abstract This study is set in the context of disadvantaged urban primary schools in Ireland. It inquires into the collaborative practices of primary teachers exploring how class teachers and support teachers develop ways of working together in an effort to improve the literacy and numeracy levels of their student. Traditionally teachers have worked in isolation and therefore ‘collaboration’ as a practice has been slow to permeate the historically embedded assumption of how a teacher should work. This study aims to answer the following questions. 1). What are the dynamics of teacher collaboration in disadvantaged urban primary schools? 2). In what ways are teacher collaboration and teacher learning related? 3). In what ways does teacher collaboration influence students’ opportunities for learning? In answering these research questions, this study aims to contribute to the body of knowledge pertaining to teacher learning through collaboration. Though current policy and literature advocate and make a case for the development of collaborative teaching practices, key studies have identified gaps in the research literature in relation to the impact of teacher collaboration in schools. This study seeks to address some of those gaps by establishing how schools develop a collaborative environment and how teaching practices are enacted in such a setting. It seeks to determine what skills, relationships, structures and conditions are most important in developing collaborative environments that foster the development of professional learning communities (PLCs). This study uses a mixed method research design involving a postal survey, four snap-shot case studies and one in depth case study in an effort to establish if collaborative practice is a feasible practice resulting in worthwhile benefits for both teachers and students. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher University College Cork en
dc.relation.uri http://library.ucc.ie/record=b2030804~S0
dc.rights © 2011, Jacinta McCarthy en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/ en
dc.subject Primary schools en
dc.subject Primary teaching en
dc.subject Disadvantaged en
dc.subject Urban en
dc.subject Literacy en
dc.subject Numeracy en
dc.subject Support teaching en
dc.subject Teacher collaboration en
dc.subject Professional learning community (PLC) en
dc.subject Case study en
dc.subject Ireland en
dc.subject.lcsh Education -- Ireland en
dc.subject.lcsh Education -- Social aspects -- Ireland en
dc.title Understanding teacher collaboration in disadvantaged urban primary schools: uncovering practices that foster professional learning communities en
dc.type Doctoral thesis en
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral en
dc.type.qualificationname PhD (Education) en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.description.status Not peer reviewed en
dc.internal.school Education en


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© 2011, Jacinta McCarthy Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2011, Jacinta McCarthy
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