Programming bugs: microbiota and the developmental origins of brain health and disease

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Codagnone, Martin G.
dc.contributor.author Spichak, Simon
dc.contributor.author O'Mahony, Siobhain M.
dc.contributor.author O'Leary, Olivia F.
dc.contributor.author Clarke, Gerard
dc.contributor.author Stanton, Catherine
dc.contributor.author Dinan, Timothy G.
dc.contributor.author Cryan, John F.
dc.date.accessioned 2020-02-13T16:58:41Z
dc.date.available 2020-02-13T16:58:41Z
dc.date.issued 2018-06-27
dc.identifier.citation Codagnone, M. G., Spichak, S., O’Mahony, S. M., O’Leary, O. F., Clarke, G., Stanton, C., Dinan, T. G. and Cryan, J. F. (2019) 'Programming Bugs: Microbiota and the Developmental Origins of Brain Health and Disease', Biological Psychiatry, 85(2), pp. 150-163. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2018.06.014 en
dc.identifier.volume 85 en
dc.identifier.issued 2 en
dc.identifier.startpage 150 en
dc.identifier.endpage 163 en
dc.identifier.issn 0006-3223
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/9650
dc.identifier.doi 10.1016/j.biopsych.2018.06.014 en
dc.description.abstract It has been nearly 30 years since Dr. David Barker first highlighted the importance of prenatal factors in contributing to the developmental origins of adult disease. This concept was later broadened to include postnatal events. It is clear that the interaction between genetic predisposition and early life environmental exposures is key in this regard. However, recent research has also identified another important factor in the microbiota—the trillions of microorganisms that inhabit key body niches, including the vagina and gastrointestinal tract. Because the composition of these maternal microbiome sites has been linked to maternal metabolism and is also vertically transmitted to offspring, changes in the maternal microbiota are poised to significantly affect the newborn. In fact, several lines of evidence show that the gut microbiota interacts with diet, drugs, and stress both prenatally and postnatally and that these exogenous factors could also affect the dynamic changes in the microbiota composition occurring during pregnancy. Animal models have shown great utility in illuminating how these disruptions result in behavioral and brain morphological phenotypes reminiscent of psychiatric disorders (anxiety, depression, schizophrenia, and autism spectrum disorders). Increasing evidence points to critical interactions among the microbiota, host genetics, and both the prenatal and postnatal environments to temporally program susceptibility to psychiatric disorders later in life. Sex-specific phenotypes may be programmed through the influence of the microbiota on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and neuroimmune system. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Elsevier en
dc.relation.uri https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006322318316056
dc.rights © 2018 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier. All rights reserved. This manuscript version is made available under the CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 licence. en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ en
dc.subject Brain development en
dc.subject Early life en
dc.subject Gut-brain axis en
dc.subject Microbiota en
dc.subject Neuropsychiatry en
dc.subject Stress en
dc.title Programming bugs: microbiota and the developmental origins of brain health and disease en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother John F Cryan, Department Of Anatomy & Neuroscience, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: j.cryan@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2020-02-13T16:50:11Z
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.internal.rssid 442421973
dc.contributor.funder Science Foundation Ireland en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Biological Psychiatry en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress j.cryan@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress simon.spichak@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress somahony@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress o.oleary@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress g.clarke@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress t.dinan@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress catherine.stanton@ucc.ie en
dc.relation.project info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/SFI/SFI Research Centres/12/RC/2273/IE/Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre (APC) - Interfacing Food & Medicine/ en


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

© 2018 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier. All rights reserved. This manuscript version is made available under the CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 licence. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2018 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier. All rights reserved. This manuscript version is made available under the CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 licence.
This website uses cookies. By using this website, you consent to the use of cookies in accordance with the UCC Privacy and Cookies Statement. For more information about cookies and how you can disable them, visit our Privacy and Cookies statement