The drivers and impact of emergency care reconfiguration in Ireland: Results from a large mixed-methods research programme

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dc.contributor.author Browne, John P.
dc.date.accessioned 2020-02-24T11:46:00Z
dc.date.available 2020-02-24T11:46:00Z
dc.date.issued 2020-02-14
dc.identifier.citation Browne, J. P. (2020) 'The drivers and impact of emergency care reconfiguration in Ireland: Results from a large mixed-methods research programme', Future Healthcare Journal, 7(1), pp. 33-37. doi: 10.7861/fhj.2019-0065 en
dc.identifier.volume 7 en
dc.identifier.issued 1 en
dc.identifier.startpage 33 en
dc.identifier.endpage 37 en
dc.identifier.issn 2055-3323
dc.identifier.issn 2055-3331
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/9691
dc.identifier.doi 10.7861/fhj.2019-0065 en
dc.description.abstract Ireland, like many countries, has reconfigured emergency care in recent years towards a more centralised model. Although centralisation is presented as ‘evidence-based’, the relevance of this evidence is challenged by groups which hold values beyond those implicit in the literature. The Study of the Impact of Reconfiguration on Emergency and Urgent Care Networks (SIREN) programme was funded to evaluate the development and performance of emergency and urgent care systems in Ireland. SIREN found that the drivers of reconfiguration in Ireland are based on safety and efficiency claims which are highly contestable. Reconfiguration was not associated with improvements in safety or efficiency and may have exacerbated the growing capacity challenges for acute hospitals. These findings are consistent with UK research. Our study adds to an emerging literature on the interaction between a narrow technocratic approach to health system planning and the perspectives of the public and patients. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Royal College of Physicians en
dc.relation.uri https://www.rcpjournals.org/content/futurehosp/7/1/33.full.pdf
dc.rights © Royal College of Physicians 2020. All rights reserved. en
dc.subject Emergency care en
dc.subject Smaller hospitals en
dc.subject Ireland en
dc.title The drivers and impact of emergency care reconfiguration in Ireland: Results from a large mixed-methods research programme en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother John P. Browne, Public Health, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: j.browne@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.check.info Access to this article is restricted until 12 months after publication by request of the publisher. en
dc.check.date 2021-02-14
dc.date.updated 2020-02-19T12:35:24Z
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.rssid 503258632
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Future Healthcare Journal en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress j.browne@ucc.ie en


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