Human methanogen diversity and incidence in healthy and diseased colonic groups using mcrA gene analysis

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dc.contributor.author Scanlan, Pauline D.
dc.contributor.author Shanahan, Fergus
dc.contributor.author Marchesi, Julian R.
dc.date.accessioned 2013-02-14T16:42:58Z
dc.date.available 2013-02-14T16:42:58Z
dc.date.copyright 2008
dc.date.issued 2008
dc.identifier.citation Scanlan, Pauline D. and Shanahan, Fergus and Marchesi, Julian R. (2008) 'Human methanogen diversity and incidence in healthy and diseased colonic groups using mcrA gene analysis'. BMC Microbiology, 8:79. http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2180/8/79 en
dc.identifier.volume 8 en
dc.identifier.issued 79 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/970
dc.identifier.doi 10.1186/1471-2180-8-79
dc.description.abstract Background: The incidence and diversity of human methanogens are insufficiently characterised in the gastrointestinal tract of both health and disease. A PCR and clone library methodology targeting the mcrA gene was adopted to facilitate the two-fold aim of surveying the relative incidence of methanogens in health and disease groups and also to provide an overview of methanogen diversity in the human gastrointestinal tract. Results: DNA faecal extracts (207 in total) from a group of healthy controls and five gastrointestinal disease groups were investigated. Colorectal cancer, polypectomised, irritable bowel syndrome and the control group had largely equivalent numbers of individuals positive for methanogens (range 45-50%). Methanogen incidence in the inflammatory bowel disease groups was reduced, 24% for ulcerative colitis and 30% for Crohn's disease. Four unique mcrA gene restriction fragment length polymorphism profiles were identified and bioinformatic analyses revealed that the majority of all sequences (94%) retrieved from libraries were 100% identical to Methanobrevibacter smithii mcrA gene. In addition, mcrA gene sequences most closely related to Methanobrevibacter oralis and members of the order Methanosarcinales were also recovered. Conclusion: The mcrA gene serves as a useful biomarker for methanogen detection in the human gut and the varying trends of methanogen incidence in the human gut could serve as important indicators of intestinal function. Although Methanobrevibacter smithii is the dominant methanogen in both the distal colon of individuals in health and disease, the diversity of methanogens is greater than previously reported. In conclusion, the low incidence of methanogens in Inflammatory Bowel Disease, the functionality of the methanogens and impact of methane production in addition to competitive interactions between methanogens and other microbial groups in the human gastrointestinal tract warrants further investigation. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher BioMed Central en
dc.relation.uri http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2180/8/79
dc.rights © 2008 Scanlan et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0 en
dc.subject Human methanogens en
dc.subject mcrA gene en
dc.subject Intestinal function en
dc.subject Bowel diseases en
dc.subject.lcsh Methanogens en
dc.title Human methanogen diversity and incidence in healthy and diseased colonic groups using mcrA gene analysis en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorurl http://research.ucc.ie/profiles/C012/fshanahan en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Fergus Shanahan, Medicine Department, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: f.shanahan@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2013-02-04T13:32:22Z
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.rssid 122827876
dc.internal.rssid 421659012
dc.contributor.funder Health Research Board en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle BMC Microbiology en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked No en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress f.shanahan@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress p.scanlan@ucc.ie


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© 2008 Scanlan et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.  This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2008 Scanlan et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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