Social factors may mediate the relationship between subjective age-related hearing loss and episodic memory

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dc.contributor.author Loughrey, David G.
dc.contributor.author Feeney, Joanne
dc.contributor.author Kee, Frank
dc.contributor.author Lawlor, Brian A.
dc.contributor.author Woodside, Jayne V.
dc.contributor.author Setti, Annalisa
dc.contributor.author McHugh Power, Joanna
dc.date.accessioned 2020-03-06T16:10:09Z
dc.date.available 2020-03-06T16:10:09Z
dc.date.issued 2020-02-18
dc.identifier.citation Loughrey, D. G., Feeney, J., Kee, F., Lawlor, B. A., Woodside, J. V., Setti, A. and Power, J. M. (2020) 'Social factors may mediate the relationship between subjective age-related hearing loss and episodic memory', Aging & Mental Health, pp. 1-8. doi: 10.1080/13607863.2020.1727847 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 8 en
dc.identifier.issn 1360-7863
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/9733
dc.identifier.doi 10.1080/13607863.2020.1727847 en
dc.description.abstract Objectives: To investigate whether the relationship between subjective age-related hearing loss (SARHL) and episodic memory functioning is mediated by measures of social functioning. Methods: Using data from 8,163 adults over 50 that participated in the Irish Longitudinal Study of Ageing (three waves, each two years apart), we used a multiple mediation model within a Structural Equation Modelling framework to explore potential social mediators of the relationship between SARHL and episodic memory functioning, controlling for demographic and health covariates. Results: Neither the direct effect of self-reported hearing difficulties on memory functioning (β = -.03), nor the total effect (β = .01), were significant. A small inconsistent indirect effect of self-reported hearing difficulties on episodic memory via weekly social activity engagement (β = -.002) was found. Conclusions: Self-reported hearing difficulties may exert an indirect effect on episodic memory via weekly social activity engagement. The findings may have implications for identification of individuals at risk of memory decline in later life. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Taylor & Francis en
dc.relation.uri https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13607863.2020.1727847
dc.rights © 2020 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. All rights reserved. This is an Accepted Manuscript of an item published by Taylor & Francis in Aging & Mental Health on 18 Feb 2020, available online: https://doi.org/10.1080/13607863.2020.1727847 en
dc.subject Age-related hearing loss en
dc.subject Cognitive decline en
dc.subject Cognitive impairment en
dc.subject Dementia en
dc.subject Episodic memory en
dc.subject Causal mechanism en
dc.title Social factors may mediate the relationship between subjective age-related hearing loss and episodic memory en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Annalisa Setti, Applied Psychology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: a.setti@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.check.info Access to this item is restricted until 12 months after publication by request of the publisher. en
dc.check.date 2021-02-18
dc.date.updated 2020-03-06T15:54:38Z
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.internal.rssid 505216536
dc.contributor.funder Centre for Ageing Research and Development in Ireland en
dc.contributor.funder Atlantic Philanthropies en
dc.contributor.funder Global Brain Health Institute en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Aging & Mental Health en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress a.setti@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.bibliocheck In press. Check vol / issue / page range. Amend citation as necessary. en
dc.relation.project Centre for Ageing Research and Development in Ireland (Leadership in Ageing Research Fellowship grant) en


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