Secret police informer files as sources for the study of vernacular religion under communism

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dc.contributor.author Hesz, Ágnes
dc.contributor.editor Kapaló, James A.
dc.contributor.editor Povedák, Kinga
dc.date.accessioned 2021-05-17T11:56:02Z
dc.date.available 2021-05-17T11:56:02Z
dc.date.issued 2021-08-13
dc.identifier.citation Hesz, A. (2021) 'Secret Police Informer Files as Sources for the Study of Vernacular Religion under Communism’, in Kapaló, J. A. and Povedák, K. (eds)., The Secret Police and the Religious Underground in Communist and Post-Communist Eastern Europe, Routledge. doi: 10.4324/9780429331466 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 23 en
dc.identifier.isbn 9780367279998
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/11332
dc.identifier.doi 10.4324/9780429331466
dc.description This research is part of the project Creative Agency and Religious Minorities: Hidden Galleries in the Secret Police Archives in Central and Eastern Europe. The project has received funding from the European Research 2020 research and innovation programme No. 677355. en
dc.description.abstract This chapter focuses on a particular type of archival material, the secret police files produced by Communist totalitarian regimes in Romania and Hungary as possible sources for the study of vernacular religion. As an analytical concept, vernacular religion refers to “religion as it is lived” (Primiano 1995). It understands religiosity as an interactive process, an ongoing intersubjective negotiation and interpretation of religious ideas and practices. Vernacular religion is thus an ongoing creative process during which individual believers and the local religious groups they are part of mould their ways of religiosity – often in the face of, and in interaction with church or state authorities. To capture its complexity, researchers mostly access vernacular religion through ethnographic fieldwork. Relying on the methodological findings of Christina Vatulescu (2010), Catherine Verdery (2014) and Sonja Luehrmann (2015), however, this chapter argues that when applying critical reading, this multivocal and generically versatile material could be used as an ample source for the study of vernacular religion. It shows that not only do these documents inform us about how people under communist dictatorships practiced and experienced religion, but in countries like Hungary, they constitute a rare window on this particular dimension of religion. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Routledge en
dc.relation.ispartof The Secret Police and the Religious Underground in Communist and Post-Communist Eastern Europe
dc.relation.ispartof Book Series: Routledge Religion, Society and Government in Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet States
dc.relation.uri http://www.routledge.com/9780367279998
dc.rights This is an Accepted Manuscript of a book chapter published by Routledge in The Secret Police and the Religious Underground in Communist and Post-Communist Eastern Europe on 13 August 2021, available online: http://www.routledge.com/9780367279998 en
dc.subject Secret police en
dc.subject Archives en
dc.subject Eastern Europe en
dc.subject Communism en
dc.subject Religion en
dc.title Secret police informer files as sources for the study of vernacular religion under communism en
dc.type Book chapter en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Ágnes Hesz, Study of Religions, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.check.info Access to this article is restricted until 12 months after publication by request of the publisher. en
dc.check.date 2022-08-13
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.contributor.funder Horizon 2020 en
dc.contributor.funder European Research Council en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.internal.bibliocheck In Press. Update citation, page numbers, rights statement en
dc.relation.project info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/H2020::ERC::ERC-STG/677355/EU/Creative Agency and Religious Minorities: ‘hidden galleries’ in the secret police archives in 20th Century Central and Eastern Europe/Hidden Galleries en


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