Rapid separation of biologically important low molecular weight compounds by microchip electrophoresis and ultra-fast performance liquid chromatography

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dc.contributor.advisor Glennon, Jeremy D. en
dc.contributor.author Hogan, Anna Maria
dc.date.accessioned 2014-02-10T11:39:02Z
dc.date.issued 2013
dc.date.submitted 2013
dc.identifier.citation Hogan, A. M. 2013. Rapid separation of biologically important low molecular weight compounds by microchip electrophoresis and ultra-fast performance liquid chromatography. PhD Thesis, University College Cork. en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/1374
dc.description.abstract The research work in this thesis reports rapid separation of biologically important low molecular weight compounds by microchip electrophoresis and ultrahigh liquid chromatography. Chapter 1 introduces the theory and principles behind capillary electrophoresis separation. An overview of the history, different modes and detection techniques coupled to CE is provided. The advantages of microchip electrophoresis are highlighted. Some aspects of metal complex analysis by capillary electrophoresis are described. Finally, the theory and different modes of the liquid chromatography technology are presented. Chapter 2 outlines the development of a method for the capillary electrophoresis of (R, S) Naproxen. Variable parameters of the separation were optimized (i.e. buffer concentration and pH, concentration of chiral selector additives, applied voltage and injection condition).The method was validated in terms of linearity, precision, and LOD. The optimized method was then transferred to a microchip electrophoresis system. Two different types of injection i.e. gated and pinched, were investigated. This microchip method represents the fastest reported chiral separation of Naproxen to date. Chapter 3 reports ultra-fast separation of aromatic amino acid by capillary electrophoresis using the short-end technique. Variable parameters of the separation were optimized and validated. The optimized method was then transferred to a microchip electrophoresis system where the separation time was further reduced. Chapter 4 outlines the use of microchip electrophoresis as an efficient tool for analysis of aluminium complexes. A 2.5 cm channel with linear imaging UV detection was used to separate and detect aluminium-dopamine complex and free dopamine. For the first time, a baseline, separation of aluminium dopamine was achieved on a 15 seconds timescale. Chapter 5 investigates a rapid, ultra-sensitive and highly efficient method for quantification of histamine in human psoriatic plaques using microdialysis and ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. The method utilized a sub-two-micron packed C18 stationary phase. A fluorescent reagent, 4-(1-pyrene) butyric acid N-hydroxysuccinimide ester was conjugated to the primary and secondary amino moieties of histamine. The dipyrene-labeled histamine in human urine was also investigated by ultrahigh pressure liquid chromatography using a C18 column with 1.8 μm particle diameter. These methods represent one of the fastest reported separations to date of histamine using fluorescence detection. en
dc.description.sponsorship Irish Research Council for Science Engineering and Technology (EMBARK initiative RS/2005/84) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher University College Cork en
dc.rights © 2013, Anna M. Hogan en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/ en
dc.subject Microchip electrophoresis en
dc.subject Ultra high pressure liquid chromatography en
dc.subject Amino acids en
dc.subject Pharmaceutical analysis en
dc.subject Fluorescence detection en
dc.subject.lcsh High performance liquid chromatography en
dc.subject.lcsh Amino acids--Separation en
dc.subject.lcsh Capillary electrophoresis en
dc.title Rapid separation of biologically important low molecular weight compounds by microchip electrophoresis and ultra-fast performance liquid chromatography en
dc.type Doctoral thesis en
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral en
dc.type.qualificationname PhD (Science) en
dc.internal.availability Full text not available en
dc.check.info Indefinite en
dc.check.date 10000-01-01
dc.description.version Accepted Version
dc.contributor.funder Irish Research Council for Science Engineering and Technology en
dc.description.status Not peer reviewed en
dc.internal.school Chemistry en
dc.check.reason This thesis is due for publication or the author is actively seeking to publish this material en
dc.check.opt-out Yes en
dc.thesis.opt-out true
dc.check.entireThesis Entire Thesis Restricted
dc.check.embargoformat Both hard copy thesis and e-thesis en
dc.internal.conferring Autumn Conferring 2013 en


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© 2013, Anna M. Hogan Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2013, Anna M. Hogan
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