Development of food ingredients for modulation of glycemia

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dc.contributor.advisor O'Mahony, Seamus Anthony en
dc.contributor.advisor Fenelon, Mark A.
dc.contributor.advisor McSweeney, Paul L. H.
dc.contributor.author Kett, Anthony Paul
dc.date.accessioned 2014-04-09T15:17:58Z
dc.date.available 2014-04-09T15:17:58Z
dc.date.issued 2013
dc.date.submitted 2013
dc.identifier.citation Kett, A. P. 2013. Development of food ingredients for modulation of glycemia. PhD Thesis, University College Cork. en
dc.identifier.endpage 345 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/1513
dc.description.abstract Starches are a source of digestible carbohydrate and are frequently used in formulated food products in the presence of other carbohydrates, proteins and fat. This thesis explored the effect of addition of neutral (Konjac glucomannan) or charged (milk proteins) polymers on the physical characteristics and digestion kinetics of waxy maize starch. The aim was to identify mechanisms to modulate the pasting properties and subsequent susceptibility to amylolytic digestion. Addition of αs- or β-caseinate protein fractions to waxy maize starch restricted granular swelling during gelatinisation, increasing granule integrity. It was shown that, while β-caseinate can adsorb to starch granules during pasting, αscaseinate can be absorbed into maize starch granules. The resultant effect was a reduction in granule size after heating, more intact granules and a subsequent decrease in starch digestion in vitro as determined by analysis of reducing sugars. The ability of αs-caseinate to reduce the level of amylolytic digestion was confirmed through in vivo pig (Teagasc, Moorepark) and human (University of Surrey, UK) trials. The scope of the thesis extended to the development of a new automated cell for attachment to a rheometer to measure digestion kinetics of starch-protein mixtures. In conclusion, the thesis offers new approaches to modulation of the physical characteristics of unmodified starch during gelatinisation and suggests that the type of protein and/or polysaccharide used in starch-based food systems may influence the ability of the food to modulate glycemia. This is an important consideration in the design of foods with positive health benefits. en
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine (Food Institutional Research Measure (FIRM)) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher University College Cork en
dc.rights © 2013, Anthony P. Kett en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/ en
dc.subject Glycemia en
dc.subject Starch en
dc.subject Caseinate en
dc.subject Gelatinisation en
dc.subject.lcsh Diet therapy en
dc.subject.lcsh Digestion en
dc.subject.lcsh Starch--Metabolism en
dc.title Development of food ingredients for modulation of glycemia en
dc.type Doctoral thesis en
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral en
dc.type.qualificationname PhD (Food Science and Technology) en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.check.info Please note that Appendices 1-5 (pp.302-345) are unavailable due to a restriction requested by the author. en
dc.description.version Accepted Version
dc.contributor.funder Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Ireland en
dc.contributor.funder Teagasc
dc.description.status Not peer reviewed en
dc.internal.school Food and Nutritional Sciences en
dc.check.reason This thesis is due for publication or the author is actively seeking to publish this material en
dc.check.opt-out Not applicable en
dc.thesis.opt-out true
dc.check.chapterOfThesis Appendices 1 - 5
dc.check.embargoformat E-thesis on CORA only en
ucc.workflow.supervisor sa.omahony@ucc.ie.
dc.internal.conferring Autumn Conferring 2013 en


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