Characterising novel anti-biofilm targets for the treatment of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in the cystic fibrosis lung

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor O'Gara, Fergal en
dc.contributor.advisor van der wal-Mooij, Marlies J. en
dc.contributor.author McCarthy, Ronan
dc.date.accessioned 2014-12-09T15:25:40Z
dc.date.issued 2014
dc.date.submitted 2014
dc.identifier.citation McCarthy, R. 2014. Characterising novel anti-biofilm targets for the treatment of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in the cystic fibrosis lung. PhD Thesis, University College Cork. en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/1739
dc.description.abstract The global rise in antibiotic resistance is a significant problem facing healthcare professionals. In particular within the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung, bacteria can establish chronic infection and resistance to a wide array of antibiotic therapies. One of the principle pathogens associated with chronic infection in the CF lung is Pseudomonas aeruginosa. P. aeruginosa can establish chronic infection in the CF lung partly through the use of the biofilm mode of growth. This biofilm mode of growth offers a considerable degree of protection from a wide variety of challenges such as the host immune system or antibiotic therapy. The threat posed by the emergence of chronic pathogens is prompting the development of next generation antimicrobials. The biofilm mode of growth is often central to the establishment of chronic infection and the development of antibiotic resistance. Thus, targeting biofilm formation has emerged as one of the principle strategies for the development of next generation antimicrobials. In this thesis two separate approaches were used to identify potential anti - biofilm targets. The first strategy focused on the identification of novel genes with a role in a biofilm formation. High throughput screening identified almost 300 genes which had a role in biofilm formation. A number of these genes were characterised at a phenotypic and a molecular level. The second strategy focused on the identification of compounds capable of inhibiting biofilm formation. A collection of marine sponge isolated bacteria were screened for the ability to inhibit the central pathway regulating biofilm formation, quorum sensing. A number of distinct isolates were identified that had quorum sensing inhibition activity from which, a Pseudomonas isolate was selected for further characterisation. A specific compound capable of inhibiting quorum sensing was identified using chemical analytical technologies in the supernatant of this marine isolate. en
dc.description.sponsorship Irish Research Council (RS/2010/2413) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher University College Cork en
dc.rights © 2014, Ronan McCarthy. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/ en
dc.subject Biofilm en
dc.subject Pseudomonas aeruginosa en
dc.subject Quorum sensing en
dc.title Characterising novel anti-biofilm targets for the treatment of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in the cystic fibrosis lung en
dc.type Doctoral thesis en
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral en
dc.type.qualificationname PhD (Science) en
dc.internal.availability Full text not available en
dc.check.info Indefinite en
dc.check.date 10000-01-01
dc.description.version Accepted Version
dc.contributor.funder Irish Research Council en
dc.description.status Not peer reviewed en
dc.internal.school Biomerit en
dc.check.reason Releasing this thesis would cause substantial prejudice to the commercial interests of University College Cork en
dc.check.opt-out Yes en
dc.thesis.opt-out true
dc.check.entireThesis Entire Thesis Restricted
dc.check.embargoformat E-thesis on CORA only en
dc.internal.conferring Summer Conferring 2014


Files in this item

Files Size Format View

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

© 2014, Ronan McCarthy. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2014, Ronan McCarthy.
This website uses cookies. By using this website, you consent to the use of cookies in accordance with the UCC Privacy and Cookies Statement. For more information about cookies and how you can disable them, visit our Privacy and Cookies statement