Factors relating to motivation to change behaviour in individuals who are overweight: application of the health belief model

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dc.contributor.advisor McCarthy, Geraldine en
dc.contributor.author Wills, Teresa
dc.date.accessioned 2015-11-11T09:45:52Z
dc.date.issued 2015
dc.date.submitted 2015
dc.identifier.citation Wills, T. 2015. Factors relating to motivation to change behaviour in individuals who are overweight: application of the health belief model. DN Thesis, University College Cork. en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/2052
dc.description.abstract Background: Obesity is the most important health challenge faced at a global level and represents a rapidly growing problem to the health of populations. Given the escalating global health problem of obesity and its co-morbidities, the need to re-appraise its management is more compelling than ever. The normalisation of obesity within our society and the acceptance of higher body weights have led to individuals being unaware of the reality of their weight status and gravity of this situation. Recognition of the problem is a key component of obesity management and it remains especially crucial to address this issue. A large amount of research has been undertaken on obesity however, limited research has been undertaken using the Health Belief Model. Aim: The aim of the research was to determine factors relating to motivation to change behaviour in individuals who perceive themselves to be overweight and investigate whether the constructs of the Health Belief Model help to explain motivation to change behaviour. Method: The research design was quantitative, correlational and cross-sectional. The design was guided by the Health Belief Model. Data Collection: Data were collected online using a multi-section and multi-item questionnaire, developed from a review of the theoretical and empirical research. Descriptive and inferential statistical analyses were employed to describe relationships between variables. Sample: A sample of 202 men and women who perceived themselves to be overweight participated in the research. Results: Following multivariate regression analysis, perceived barriers to weight loss and perceived benefits of weight loss were significant predictors of motivation to change behaviour. The perceived barriers to weight loss which were significant were psychological barriers to weight loss (p =<0.019) and environmental barriers to physical activity (p=<0.032).The greatest predictor of motivation to change behaviour was the perceived benefits of weight loss (p<0.001). Perceived susceptibility to obesity and perceived severity of obesity did not emerge as significant predictors in this model. Total variance explained by the model was 33.5%. Conclusion: Perceived barriers to weight loss and perceived benefits of weight loss are important determinants of motivation to change behaviour. The current study demonstrated the limited applicability of the Health Belief Model constructs to motivation to change behaviour, as not all core dimensions proved significant predictors of the dependant variable. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher University College Cork en
dc.rights © 2015, Teresa Wills. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/ en
dc.subject Obesity en
dc.subject Health belief model en
dc.title Factors relating to motivation to change behaviour in individuals who are overweight: application of the health belief model en
dc.type Doctoral thesis en
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral en
dc.type.qualificationname Doctor of Nursing Practice en
dc.internal.availability Full text not available en
dc.check.info Indefinite en
dc.check.date 10000-01-01
dc.description.version Accepted Version
dc.description.status Not peer reviewed en
dc.internal.school Nursing and Midwifery en
dc.check.reason This thesis is due for publication or the author is actively seeking to publish this material en
dc.check.opt-out No en
dc.thesis.opt-out true
dc.check.entireThesis Entire Thesis Restricted
dc.check.embargoformat E-thesis on CORA only en
dc.internal.conferring Summer Conferring 2015


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© 2015, Teresa Wills. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2015, Teresa Wills.
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