Symptom burden and its relationship to functional performance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Savage, Eileen en
dc.contributor.advisor Lehane, Elaine A. en
dc.contributor.author Melhem, Omar
dc.date.accessioned 2016-05-11T10:22:54Z
dc.date.available 2016-05-11T10:22:54Z
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.date.submitted 2016
dc.identifier.citation Melhem, O. 2016. Symptom burden and its relationship to functional performance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PhD Thesis, University College Cork. en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/2536
dc.description.abstract The aim of this study was to explore symptom burden and its relationship to functional performance in patients with COPD. A descriptive, cross-sectional, correlational survey design was used and a sample of 214 patients with COPD. The sample was recruited from patients attending one of the major teaching hospitals in Dublin. Symptom burden was measured using the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale (MSAS), and the functional performance was measured using the Functional Performance Inventory-Short Form (FPISF). Findings revealed that participants experienced a median of 13 symptoms. The most burdensome symptoms were shortness of breath, lack of energy, difficulty sleeping, worrying, dry mouth, feeling nervous, feeling irritable, and feeling sad. Participants with very severe COPD had the greatest symptom burden, followed by those with severe COPD, moderate COPD, and mild COPD. Symptom burden was higher for the psychological symptoms compared to the physical symptoms. Participants with mild COPD had the highest functional performance, followed by those with moderate COPD, very severe COPD, and severe COPD. Twenty symptoms were negatively correlated with overall functional performance, indicating that high symptom burden for those symptoms was associated with low overall functional performance. Moderate, negative, statistically significant correlations were found between the total symptom burden and overall functional performance, physical symptom burden and overall functional performance and psychological symptom burden and overall functional performance. A negative linear relationship was found between total symptom burden and overall functional performance among all stages of COPD except the mild group. No relationship was found between total symptom burden and overall functional performance for the moderate group. Healthcare professionals need to broaden the clinical and research assessment of physical and psychological symptoms in COPD; alleviating the burden of these symptoms may promote improved functional performance. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher University College Cork en
dc.rights © 2016, Omar Melhem. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/ en
dc.subject Symptom en
dc.subject Symptom burden en
dc.subject Functional performance en
dc.subject COPD en
dc.subject Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease en
dc.title Symptom burden and its relationship to functional performance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease en
dc.type Doctoral thesis en
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral en
dc.type.qualificationname Doctor of Nursing Practice en
dc.internal.availability Full text not available en
dc.check.info No embargo required en
dc.description.version Accepted Version
dc.description.status Not peer reviewed en
dc.internal.school Nursing and Midwifery en
dc.check.type No Embargo Required
dc.check.reason No embargo required en
dc.check.opt-out No en
dc.thesis.opt-out true
dc.check.embargoformat Not applicable en
dc.internal.conferring Summer 2016 en


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

© 2016, Omar Melhem. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2016, Omar Melhem.
This website uses cookies. By using this website, you consent to the use of cookies in accordance with the UCC Privacy and Cookies Statement. For more information about cookies and how you can disable them, visit our Privacy and Cookies statement