Representation and participation in child care proceedings: what about the voice of the parents?

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dc.contributor.author O'Mahony, Conor
dc.contributor.author Burns, Kenneth
dc.contributor.author Parkes, Aisling
dc.contributor.author Shore, Caroline
dc.date.accessioned 2016-05-24T10:12:39Z
dc.date.available 2016-05-24T10:12:39Z
dc.date.issued 2016-05-02
dc.identifier.citation O’Mahony, C., Burns, K., Parkes, A. & Shore, C. 2016. Representation and participation in child care proceedings: what about the voice of the parents? Journal of Social Welfare and Family Law, 1-21. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09649069.2016.1176338 en
dc.identifier.volume 38 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 21 en
dc.identifier.issn 0964-9069
dc.identifier.issn 1469-9621
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/2605
dc.identifier.doi 10.1080/09649069.2016.1176338
dc.description.abstract In Ireland, the Constitution guarantees very strong rights to parents and the family, and there has been a long and unfortunate history of failures to adequately protect children at risk. As a result, there has been much discussion in recent years about the need to improve legal mechanisms designed to protect the rights of children. By comparison, little attention has been given to establishing whether the theoretically strong rights of parents translate into strongly protected rights in practice. This paper presents new empirical evidence on the manner in which child care proceedings in Ireland balance the rights and interests of children and parents, including the rates at which orders are granted, the frequency of and conditions in which legal representation is provided, and the extent to which parents are able to actively participate in proceedings. A number of systemic issues are identified that restrict the capacity of the system to emphasise parental rights and hear the voice of parents to the extent that would be expected when looking at the legal provisions in isolation. en
dc.description.sponsorship University College Cork (UCC Strategic Research Fund, the School of Law Strategic Fund and the College of Arts, Celtic Studies and Social Science) en
dc.description.sponsorship University College Cork (UCC Strategic Research Fund, the School of Law Strategic Fund and the College of Arts, Celtic Studies and Social Science) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Taylor & Francis en
dc.rights © 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Journal of Social Welfare and Family Law on 02/06/2016, available online: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09649069.2016.1176338 en
dc.subject Child protection en
dc.subject Parental rights en
dc.subject Legal representation en
dc.subject Participation en
dc.subject Ireland en
dc.title Representation and participation in child care proceedings: what about the voice of the parents? en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Kenneth Burns, Applied Social Studies, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: k.burns@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.check.info Access to this item is restricted until 12 months after publication by the request of the publisher. en
dc.check.date 2017-05-02
dc.date.updated 2016-05-23T11:28:29Z
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.internal.rssid 323069291
dc.contributor.funder University College Cork en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Journal of Social Welfare and Family Law en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked No. Email correspondence with Siobhan. Siobhan has checked already. !!CORA!! Yes. en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress k.burns@ucc.ie en


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