Learning curves: analysing pace and challenge in four successful puzzle games

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dc.contributor.author Linehan, Conor
dc.contributor.author Bellord, George
dc.contributor.author Kirman, Ben
dc.contributor.author Morford, Zachary H.
dc.contributor.author Roche, Bryan
dc.date.accessioned 2017-01-11T09:22:28Z
dc.date.available 2017-01-11T09:22:28Z
dc.date.issued 2014-01
dc.identifier.citation Linehan, C., Bellord, G., Kirman, B., Morford, Z. H. and Roche, B. (2014) ‘Learning curves: analysing pace and challenge in four successful puzzle games’, in Proceedings of the first ACM SIGCHI annual symposium on Computer-human interaction in play (CHI PLAY '14), Toronto, Ontario, Canada, 19-21 October. New York, NY, USA: ACM, pp. 181-190. doi: 10.1145/2658537.2658695 en
dc.identifier.startpage 181 en
dc.identifier.endpage 190 en
dc.identifier.isbn 978-1-4503-3014-5
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/3461
dc.identifier.doi 10.1145/2658537.2658695
dc.description.abstract The pace at which challenges are introduced in a game has long been identified as a key determinant of both the enjoyment and difficulty experienced by game players, and their ability to learn from game play. In order to understand how to best pace challenges in games, there is great value in analysing games already demonstrated as highly engaging. Play-through videos of four puzzle games (Portal, Portal 2 Co-operative mode, Braid and Lemmings), were observed and analysed using metrics derived from a behavioural psychology understanding of how people solve problems. Findings suggest that; 1) the main skills learned in each game are introduced separately, 2) through simple puzzles that require only basic performance of that skill, 3) the player has the opportunity to practice and integrate that skill with previously learned skills, and 4) puzzles increase in complexity until the next new skill is introduced. These data provide practical guidance for designers, support contemporary thinking on the design of learning structures in games, and suggest future directions for empirical research. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Association for Computing Machinery en
dc.relation.ispartof CHI PLAY '14 Proceedings of the first ACM SIGCHI annual symposium on Computer-human interaction in play
dc.rights © 2014, ACM. This is the author’s version of the work. It is posted here by permission of ACM for your personal use. Not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Proceedings of the first ACM SIGCHI annual symposium on Computer-human interaction in play (CHI PLAY '14). en
dc.subject Education en
dc.subject Gamification en
dc.subject Learning curve en
dc.title Learning curves: analysing pace and challenge in four successful puzzle games en
dc.type Conference item en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Conor Linehan, Applied Psychology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: conor.linehan@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2017-01-10T12:59:27Z
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.internal.rssid 295221051
dc.description.status Not peer reviewed en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.conferencelocation Toronto, Ontario, Canada en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress conor.linehan@ucc.ie en


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