Best interests in the Mental Capacity Act: time to say goodbye?

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dc.contributor.author Donnelly, Mary
dc.date.accessioned 2017-05-04T11:29:12Z
dc.date.available 2017-05-04T11:29:12Z
dc.date.issued 2016-12-22
dc.identifier.citation Donnelly, M. (2016) 'Best Interests in the Mental Capacity Act: Time to say Goodbye?', Medical Law Review, 24(3), pp. 318-332. doi: 10.1093/medlaw/fww030 en
dc.identifier.volume 24 en
dc.identifier.issued 3 en
dc.identifier.startpage 318 en
dc.identifier.endpage 332 en
dc.identifier.issn 0967-0742
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/3914
dc.identifier.doi 10.1093/medlaw/fww030
dc.description.abstract Article 12 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, as interpreted by the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in General Comment No. 1, offers a vision for law’s response to capacity impairments which differs in crucial ways from that contained in the Mental Capacity Act 2005. The Committee rejects the functional test for capacity and requires that a ‘will and preferences’ paradigm must replace the ‘best interests’ paradigm and that all substitute decision-making regimes must be abolished. This article draws on the position adopted in General Comment No. 1 in evaluating the best interests standard in the Mental Capacity Act. It sets out the normative case for a stronger legislative endorsement of will and preferences and the inclusion of greater support mechanisms but rejects the contention that all substitute decision-making can, or should, be abolished. It also argues that the best interests standard in the Mental Capacity Act retains some revolutionary potential and that, pending legislative reform, this can be further developed through the courts. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Oxford University Press en
dc.rights © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Autonomy en
dc.subject Best interests en
dc.subject Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities en
dc.subject Court of Protection en
dc.subject Dignity en
dc.subject Impaired capacity en
dc.subject Will and preference en
dc.title Best interests in the Mental Capacity Act: time to say goodbye? en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Mary Donnelly, Law, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: m.donnelly@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2017-05-04T11:21:14Z
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.rssid 375401088
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Medical Law Review en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked No !!CORA!! en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress m.donnelly@ucc.ie en


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© The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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