The relationship between actual fundamental motor skill proficiency, perceived motor skill confidence and competence, and physical activity in 8–12-year-old Irish female youth

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dc.contributor.author Farmer, Orlagh
dc.contributor.author Belton, Sarahjane
dc.contributor.author O'Brien, Wesley
dc.date.accessioned 2017-12-08T13:33:48Z
dc.date.available 2017-12-08T13:33:48Z
dc.date.issued 2017-09-27
dc.identifier.citation Farmer, O., Belton, S. and O’Brien, W. (2017) 'The relationship between actual fundamental motor skill proficiency, perceived motor skill confidence and competence, and physical activity in 8–12-year-old Irish female youth', Sports, 5(4), 74 (13pp). doi: 10.3390/sports5040074 en
dc.identifier.volume 5
dc.identifier.issued 4
dc.identifier.startpage 1
dc.identifier.endpage 13
dc.identifier.issn 2075-4663
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/5157
dc.identifier.doi 10.3390/sports5040074
dc.description.abstract This study examines the relationship between actual fundamental motor skill (FMS) proficiency, perceived motor confidence and competence, and physical activity (PA) among female children (n= 160; mean age = 10.69 ± 1.40 years). The Test of Gross Motor Development-2nd Edition (TGMD-2) was used to assess seven FMSs (locomotor, object-control, and stability). Motor confidence and competence were assessed using a valid skill-specific scale, and a modified version of the Self-Perception Profile for Children. PA levels were assessed using self-report (PA Questionnaire for Older Children (PAQ-C)) and classified as low, moderate, and high active. One-way and two-way ANOVAs (post-hoc honest significant difference (HSD)) and correlation coefficients were used to analyse the data. Findings indicate that the majority of youth (71.8%) were not meeting the minimum 60 min of daily PA recommended for health, and that 98.1% did not achieve the FMS proficiency expected for their age. While there were high levels of perceived physical self-confidence (PSC) reported within FMS skill-specific tasks, there was no significant correlation observed between actual FMS proficiency and perceived PSC among the cohort. Results show that low, moderately, and highly active female participants differ significantly in terms of their overall FMS (p = 0.03) and locomotor (LOC) control scores (p = 0.03). Results from a two-way between-groups analysis of variance also revealed no statistically significant interaction effect between PA grouping and physical performance self-concept (PPSC) on overall FMS proficiency levels. Results of a multiple linear regression indicate that perceived PSC is a significant predictor (beta = 0.183) of participants’ overall PA levels. Data show a need for targeting low levels of PA, and low FMS proficiency in female youth, and for developing interventions aiming to enhance perceived PSC levels. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher MDPI en
dc.relation.uri http://www.mdpi.com/2075-4663/5/4/74
dc.rights © 2017, the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subject Fundamental movement skills en
dc.subject Perceived physical self-confidence en
dc.subject Physical performance self-concept en
dc.subject Physical activity en
dc.subject Female youth en
dc.title The relationship between actual fundamental motor skill proficiency, perceived motor skill confidence and competence, and physical activity in 8–12-year-old Irish female youth en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Wesley O'Brien, Education, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: wesley.obrien@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Sports en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress wesley.obrien@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid 74


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© 2017, the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2017, the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)
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