Psycho-spatial disidentification and class fractions in a study of social class and identity in an urban post-primary school community in Ireland

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dc.contributor.author Cahill, Kevin
dc.date.accessioned 2018-07-25T09:10:52Z
dc.date.available 2018-07-25T09:10:52Z
dc.date.issued 2016-09-01
dc.identifier.citation Cahill, K. (2018) 'Psycho-spatial disidentification and class fractions in a study of social class and identity in an urban post-primary school community in Ireland', Research Papers in Education, 33(1), pp. 59-72. doi:10.1080/02671522.2016.1225809 en
dc.identifier.volume 33 en
dc.identifier.issued 1 en
dc.identifier.startpage 59 en
dc.identifier.endpage 72 en
dc.identifier.issn 0267-1522
dc.identifier.issn 1470-1146
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/6498
dc.identifier.doi 10.1080/02671522.2016.1225809
dc.description.abstract This paper draws on a three-year critical ethnography which interrogated intersections of social class, school and identity in an urban Irish community. The focus here is on the psycho-spatial disidentifications, inscriptions and class fractioning enacted throughout the school and community of Portown by a cohort of succeeding students from this predominantly working-class community. This paper makes a significant contribution through a unique focus on the intersections between class, schooling and identity in the Irish context. Themes based around perceived distinction and differences serve to highlight the effects of pervasive neoliberal philosophies pertaining to the commodification of education and competitive individualism. Some participants in the study engaged in identity work enacting escape and difference from their working-class community as artefacts of success. An angelicisation of the middle-class habitus is engaged throughout as the participant identities are wrought from their experiences of school and community actions, interactions and perceptions. The central concern here is the interplay between social mobility, social class and student identity in an Irish urban environment. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Taylor and Francis Group (Routledge) en
dc.rights © 2016, Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. All rights reserved. This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Research Papers in Education on 1 September, 2016, available online: https://doi.org/10.1080/02671522.2016.1225809 en
dc.subject Social mobility en
dc.subject Psycho-spatial disidentification en
dc.subject Neoliberalism and education en
dc.subject Identity and education en
dc.subject Working-class en
dc.subject Middle-class en
dc.subject Education en
dc.subject Choice en
dc.subject City en
dc.subject Markets en
dc.subject Places en
dc.subject Youth en
dc.subject Chavs en
dc.title Psycho-spatial disidentification and class fractions in a study of social class and identity in an urban post-primary school community in Ireland en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Kevin Cahill, Education, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: k.cahill@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2018-07-24T11:02:43Z
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.internal.rssid 433570248
dc.internal.wokid WOS:000428304600004
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Research Papers in Education en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress K.Cahill@ucc.ie en


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