Relationship between physical activity, screen time and weight status among young adolescents

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dc.contributor.author O'Brien, Wesley
dc.contributor.author Issartel, Johann
dc.contributor.author Belton, Sarahjane
dc.date.accessioned 2018-09-27T12:08:13Z
dc.date.available 2018-09-27T12:08:13Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.citation O’Brien, W., Issartel, J. and Belton, S. (2018) 'Relationship between physical activity, screen time and weight status among young adolescents', Sports, 6(3), 57 (11pp). doi: 10.3390/sports6030057 en
dc.identifier.volume 6
dc.identifier.issued 3
dc.identifier.startpage 1
dc.identifier.endpage 11
dc.identifier.issn 2075-4663
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/6928
dc.identifier.doi 10.3390/sports6030057
dc.description.abstract It is well established that lack of physical activity and high bouts of sedentary behaviour are now associated with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between physical activity participation, overall screen time and weight status amongst early Irish adolescent youth. Participants were a sample of 169 students: 113 boys (mean age = 12.89 ± 0.34 years) and 56 girls (mean age = 12.87 ± 0.61 years). The data gathered in the present study included physical activity (accelerometry), screen time (self-report) and anthropometric measurements. Overweight and obese participants accumulated significantly more minutes of overall screen time daily compared to their normal-weight counterparts. A correlation between physical activity and daily television viewing was evident among girls. No significant interaction was apparent when examining daily physical activity and overall screen time in the prediction of early adolescents’ body mass index. Results suggest the importance of reducing screen time in the contribution towards a healthier weight status among adolescents. Furthermore, physical activity appears largely unrelated to overall screen time in predicting adolescent weight status, suggesting that these variables may be independent markers of health in youth. The existing relationship for girls between moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and time spent television viewing may be a potential area to consider for future intervention design with adolescent youth. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher MDPI en
dc.relation.uri http://www.mdpi.com/2075-4663/6/3/57
dc.rights © 2018, the Authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subject Overweight en
dc.subject Obese en
dc.subject Sedentary behaviour en
dc.subject Accelerometer en
dc.title Relationship between physical activity, screen time and weight status among young adolescents en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Wesley O'Brien, Education, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: wesley.obrien@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.contributor.funder Wicklow Vocational Education Committee
dc.contributor.funder Wicklow Local Sports Partnership
dc.contributor.funder Dublin City University
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Sports en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress wesley.obrien@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid 57


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© 2018, the Authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2018, the Authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
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