Borders, risk and belonging: Challenges for arts-based research in understanding the lives of women asylum seekers and migrants 'at the borders of humanity'

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dc.contributor.author O'Neill, Maggie
dc.contributor.author Erel, Umut
dc.contributor.author Kaptani, Erene
dc.contributor.author Reynolds, Tracey
dc.date.accessioned 2019-07-08T11:22:40Z
dc.date.available 2019-07-08T11:22:40Z
dc.date.issued 2019-04-01
dc.identifier.citation O'Neill, M., Erel, U., Kaptani, E. and Reynolds, T. (2019) 'Borders, risk and belonging: Challenges for arts-based research in understanding the lives of women asylum seekers and migrants 'at the borders of humanity'', Crossings: Journal of Migration and Culture, 10(1), pp. 129-147. doi: 10.1386/cjmc.10.1.129_1 en
dc.identifier.volume 10 en
dc.identifier.issued 1 en
dc.identifier.startpage 129 en
dc.identifier.endpage 147 en
dc.identifier.issn 2040-4344
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/8121
dc.identifier.doi 10.1386/cjmc.10.1.129_1 en
dc.description.abstract This article critically discusses the experiences of women who are seeking asylum in the North East of England and women who are mothers with no recourse to public funds living in London to address the questions posed by the special issue. It argues both epistemologically and methodologically for the benefits of undertaking participatory arts-based, ethno-mimetic, performative methods with women and communities to better understand women’s lives, build local capacity in seeking policy change, as well as contribute to theorizing necropolitics through praxis. Drawing upon artistic outcomes of research funded by the Leverhulme Trust on borders, risk and belonging, and collaborative research funded by the ESRC/NCRM using participatory theatre and walking methods, the article addresses the questions posed by the special issue: how is statelessness experienced by women seeking asylum and mothers with no recourse to public funds? To what extent are their lived experiences marked by precarity, social and civil death? What does it mean to be a woman and a mother in these precarious times, ‘at the borders of humanity’? Where are the spaces for resistance and how might we as artists and researchers ‐ across the arts, humanities and social sciences ‐ contribute and activate? en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Intellect Ltd. en
dc.relation.uri https://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/intellect/cjmc/2019/00000010/00000001/art00010
dc.rights © 2019, Intellect Ltd. Open Access. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject PAR en
dc.subject Migration en
dc.subject No Recourse to Public Funds policy en
dc.subject Necropolitics en
dc.subject Women migrants en
dc.subject Ethno-mimesis en
dc.subject Decolonial epistemologies en
dc.subject United Kingdom en
dc.title Borders, risk and belonging: Challenges for arts-based research in understanding the lives of women asylum seekers and migrants 'at the borders of humanity' en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Maggie O'Neill, Sociology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: maggie.oneill@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2019-07-05T11:56:18Z
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.rssid 491677238
dc.contributor.funder Leverhulme Trust en
dc.contributor.funder ESRC National Centre for Research Methods, University of Southampton en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Crossings: Journal of Migration and Culture en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress maggie.oneill@ucc.ie en


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© 2019, Intellect Ltd. Open Access. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2019, Intellect Ltd. Open Access. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
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